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Emerging molecular classifications and therapeutic implications for gastric cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Ai zheng Aizheng Chinese journal of cancer, May 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
32 Mendeley
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Title
Emerging molecular classifications and therapeutic implications for gastric cancer
Published in
Ai zheng Aizheng Chinese journal of cancer, May 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40880-016-0111-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tao Chen, Xiao-Yue Xu, Ping-Hong Zhou

Abstract

Gastric cancer (GC) is a highly aggressive and life-threatening malignancy. Even with radical surgical removal and front-line chemotherapy, more than half of GCs locally relapse and metastasize at a distant site. The dismal outcomes reflect the ineffectiveness of a one-size-fits-all approach for a highly heterogeneous disease with diverse etiological causes and complex molecular underpinnings. The recent comprehensive genomic and molecular profiling has led to our deepened understanding of GC. The emerging molecular classification schemes based on the genetic, epigenetic, and molecular signatures are providing great promise for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies in a more personalized and precise manner. To this end, the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) research network conducted a comprehensive molecular evaluation of primary GCs and proposed a new molecular classification dividing GCs into four subtypes: Epstein-Barr virus-associated tumors, microsatellite unstable tumors, genomically stable tumors, and tumors with chromosomal instability. This review primarily focuses on the TCGA molecular classification of GCs and discusses the implications on novel targeted therapy strategies. We believe that these fundamental findings will support the future application of targeted therapies and will guide our efforts to develop more efficacious drugs to treat human GCs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 32 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 25%
Researcher 8 25%
Student > Postgraduate 4 13%
Student > Master 3 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 22%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2016.
All research outputs
#5,665,100
of 7,836,572 outputs
Outputs from Ai zheng Aizheng Chinese journal of cancer
#82
of 160 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,632
of 269,353 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ai zheng Aizheng Chinese journal of cancer
#5
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,836,572 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 160 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.5. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,353 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.