↓ Skip to main content

Gut microbiota composition correlates with diet and health in the elderly

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, July 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
2067 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2882 Mendeley
citeulike
11 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Gut microbiota composition correlates with diet and health in the elderly
Published in
Nature, July 2012
DOI 10.1038/nature11319
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcus J. Claesson, Ian B. Jeffery, Susana Conde, Susan E. Power, Eibhlís M. O’Connor, Siobhán Cusack, Hugh M. B. Harris, Mairead Coakley, Bhuvaneswari Lakshminarayanan, Orla O’Sullivan, Gerald F. Fitzgerald, Jennifer Deane, Michael O’Connor, Norma Harnedy, Kieran O’Connor, Denis O’Mahony, Douwe van Sinderen, Martina Wallace, Lorraine Brennan, Catherine Stanton, Julian R. Marchesi, Anthony P. Fitzgerald, Fergus Shanahan, Colin Hill, R. Paul Ross, Paul W. O’Toole

Abstract

Alterations in intestinal microbiota composition are associated with several chronic conditions, including obesity and inflammatory diseases. The microbiota of older people displays greater inter-individual variation than that of younger adults. Here we show that the faecal microbiota composition from 178 elderly subjects formed groups, correlating with residence location in the community, day-hospital, rehabilitation or in long-term residential care. However, clustering of subjects by diet separated them by the same residence location and microbiota groupings. The separation of microbiota composition significantly correlated with measures of frailty, co-morbidity, nutritional status, markers of inflammation and with metabolites in faecal water. The individual microbiota of people in long-stay care was significantly less diverse than that of community dwellers. Loss of community-associated microbiota correlated with increased frailty. Collectively, the data support a relationship between diet, microbiota and health status, and indicate a role for diet-driven microbiota alterations in varying rates of health decline upon ageing.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 238 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,882 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 34 1%
United Kingdom 9 <1%
Canada 9 <1%
Japan 7 <1%
Spain 7 <1%
Italy 6 <1%
Denmark 6 <1%
Germany 6 <1%
Ireland 4 <1%
Other 40 1%
Unknown 2754 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 544 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 503 17%
Student > Master 366 13%
Student > Bachelor 364 13%
Other 131 5%
Other 538 19%
Unknown 436 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 838 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 415 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 401 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 171 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 85 3%
Other 412 14%
Unknown 560 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 507. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2022.
All research outputs
#36,136
of 21,406,274 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#3,570
of 88,022 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#102
of 143,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#23
of 890 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,406,274 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88,022 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 97.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 143,418 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 890 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.