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Evaluation of Yersinia pestis Transmission Pathways for Sylvatic Plague in Prairie Dog Populations in the Western U.S.

Overview of attention for article published in EcoHealth, May 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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33 Mendeley
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Title
Evaluation of Yersinia pestis Transmission Pathways for Sylvatic Plague in Prairie Dog Populations in the Western U.S.
Published in
EcoHealth, May 2016
DOI 10.1007/s10393-016-1133-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Katherine L. D. Richgels, Robin E. Russell, Gebbiena M. Bron, Tonie E. Rocke

Abstract

Sylvatic plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, is periodically responsible for large die-offs in rodent populations that can spillover and cause human mortalities. In the western US, prairie dog populations experience nearly 100% mortality during plague outbreaks, suggesting that multiple transmission pathways combine to amplify plague dynamics. Several alternate pathways in addition to flea vectors have been proposed, such as transmission via direct contact with bodily fluids or inhalation of infectious droplets, consumption of carcasses, and environmental sources of plague bacteria, such as contaminated soil. However, evidence supporting the ability of these proposed alternate pathways to trigger large-scale epizootics remains elusive. Here we present a short review of potential plague transmission pathways and use an ordinary differential equation model to assess the contribution of each pathway to resulting plague dynamics in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) and their fleas (Oropsylla hirsuta). Using our model, we found little evidence to suggest that soil contamination was capable of producing plague epizootics in prairie dogs. However, in the absence of flea transmission, direct transmission, i.e., contact with bodily fluids or inhalation of infectious droplets, could produce enzootic dynamics, and transmission via contact with or consumption of carcasses could produce epizootics. This suggests that these pathways warrant further investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 27%
Student > Bachelor 8 24%
Student > Master 8 24%
Unspecified 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 17 52%
Unspecified 6 18%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 12%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 May 2016.
All research outputs
#9,643,507
of 12,562,772 outputs
Outputs from EcoHealth
#397
of 491 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,749
of 264,472 outputs
Outputs of similar age from EcoHealth
#15
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,562,772 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 491 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,472 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.