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Alzheimer’s disease Aβ assemblies mediating rapid disruption of synaptic plasticity and memory

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Brain, January 2012
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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68 Dimensions

Readers on

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120 Mendeley
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Title
Alzheimer’s disease Aβ assemblies mediating rapid disruption of synaptic plasticity and memory
Published in
Molecular Brain, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1756-6606-5-25
Pubmed ID
Authors

Igor Klyubin, William K Cullen, Neng-Wei Hu, Michael J Rowan

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by episodic memory impairment that often precedes clinical diagnosis by many years. Probing the mechanisms of such impairment may provide much needed means of diagnosis and therapeutic intervention at an early, pre-dementia, stage. Prior to the onset of significant neurodegeneration, the structural and functional integrity of synapses in mnemonic circuitry is severely compromised in the presence of amyloidosis. This review examines recent evidence evaluating the role of amyloid-ß protein (Aβ) in causing rapid disruption of synaptic plasticity and memory impairment. We evaluate the relative importance of different sizes and conformations of Aβ, including monomer, oligomer, protofibril and fibril. We pay particular attention to recent controversies over the relevance to the pathophysiology of AD of different water soluble Aβ aggregates and the importance of cellular prion protein in mediating their effects. Current data are consistent with the view that both low-n oligomers and larger soluble assemblies present in AD brain, some of them via a direct interaction with cellular prion protein, cause synaptic memory failure. At the two extremes of aggregation, monomers and fibrils appear to act in vivo both as sources and sinks of certain metastable conformations of soluble aggregates that powerfully disrupt synaptic plasticity. The same principle appears to apply to other synaptotoxic amyloidogenic proteins including tau, α-synuclein and prion protein.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 3%
Germany 2 2%
France 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Mexico 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Unknown 109 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 27%
Researcher 24 20%
Student > Master 18 15%
Student > Bachelor 11 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 7%
Other 20 17%
Unknown 7 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 14 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 11%
Neuroscience 12 10%
Psychology 10 8%
Other 13 11%
Unknown 11 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2012.
All research outputs
#3,730,118
of 13,441,297 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Brain
#149
of 616 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#32,491
of 121,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Brain
#1
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,441,297 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 616 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,604 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them