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Novel Bacteriophages Containing a Genome of Another Bacteriophage within Their Genomes

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, July 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
97 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Novel Bacteriophages Containing a Genome of Another Bacteriophage within Their Genomes
Published in
PLOS ONE, July 2012
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0040683
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maud M. Swanson, Brian Reavy, Kira S. Makarova, Peter J. Cock, David W. Hopkins, Lesley Torrance, Eugene V. Koonin, Michael Taliansky

Abstract

A novel bacteriophage infecting Staphylococus pasteuri was isolated during a screen for phages in Antarctic soils. The phage named SpaA1 is morphologically similar to phages of the family Siphoviridae. The 42,784 bp genome of SpaA1 is a linear, double-stranded DNA molecule with 3' protruding cohesive ends. The SpaA1 genome encompasses 63 predicted protein-coding genes which cluster within three regions of the genome, each of apparently different origin, in a mosaic pattern. In two of these regions, the gene sets resemble those in prophages of Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki str. T03a001 (genes involved in DNA replication/transcription, cell entry and exit) and B. cereus AH676 (additional regulatory and recombination genes), respectively. The third region represents an almost complete genome (except for the short terminal segments) of a distinct bacteriophage, MZTP02. Nearly the same gene module was identified in prophages of B. thuringiensis serovar monterrey BGSC 4AJ1 and B. cereus Rock4-2. These findings suggest that MZTP02 can be shuttled between genomes of other bacteriophages and prophages, leading to the formation of chimeric genomes. The presence of a complete phage genome in the genome of other phages apparently has not been described previously and might represent a 'fast track' route of virus evolution and horizontal gene transfer. Another phage (BceA1) nearly identical in sequence to SpaA1, and also including the almost complete MZTP02 genome within its own genome, was isolated from a bacterium of the B. cereus/B. thuringiensis group. Remarkably, both SpaA1 and BceA1 phages can infect B. cereus and B. thuringiensis, but only one of them, SpaA1, can infect S. pasteuri. This finding is best compatible with a scenario in which MZTP02 was originally contained in BceA1 infecting Bacillus spp, the common hosts for these two phages, followed by emergence of SpaA1 infecting S. pasteuri.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Canada 2 2%
Brazil 2 2%
United Kingdom 2 2%
India 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
France 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 84 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 25%
Student > Master 11 11%
Student > Bachelor 6 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 4%
Other 16 16%
Unknown 11 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 9 9%
Environmental Science 7 7%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 7 7%
Unknown 13 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2014.
All research outputs
#816,239
of 16,115,087 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#12,569
of 158,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,524
of 128,576 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#216
of 3,375 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,115,087 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 158,500 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 128,576 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,375 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.