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Wild food plants and fungi used in the mycophilous Tibetan community of Zhagana (Tewo County, Gansu, China)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2016
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2 tweeters
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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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15 Dimensions

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34 Mendeley
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Title
Wild food plants and fungi used in the mycophilous Tibetan community of Zhagana (Tewo County, Gansu, China)
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13002-016-0094-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jin Kang, Yongxiang Kang, Xiaolian Ji, Quanping Guo, Guillaume Jacques, Marcin Pietras, Nasim Łuczaj, Dengwu Li, Łukasz Łuczaj

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate knowledge and use of wild food plants and fungi in a highland valley in the Gannan Tibetan Autonomous Region on the north-eastern edges of the Tibetan Plateau. Field research was carried out in four neighbouring villages in a mountain valley of the Diebu (Tewo) county, surrounded by spruce forests. The study consisted of 30 interviews with single informants, or group interviews (altogether 63 informants). Apart from collecting voucher specimens, we also identified fungi using DNA barcoding. We recorded the use of 54 species of vascular plants. We also recorded the use of 22 mushroom taxa, which made up the largest category of wild foods. Fruits formed the largest category of food plants, with 21 species, larger than the wild greens category, which consisted of 20 species eaten after boiling or frying and 7 as raw snacks. We also recorded the alimentary use of 10 species of edible flowers and 3 species with underground edible organs. On average, 20.8 edible taxa were listed per interview (median - 21). The most listed category of wild foods was green vegetables (mean - 7.5 species, median - 8 species), but fruits and mushrooms were listed nearly as frequently (mean - 6.3, median - 6 and mean - 5.8, - median 6 respectively). Other category lists were very short, e.g., flowers (mean - 1.3, median - 1) and underground edible parts (mean - 0.7, median - 1). Wild vegetables are usually boiled and/or fried and served as side-dishes, or their green parts are eaten as snacks during mountain treks (e.g., peeled rhubarb shoots). Wild fruits are mainly collected by children and eaten raw, they are not stored for further use. The most widely used wild staple foods are Potetilla anserina roots, an important ceremonial food served on such occasions as New Year or at funerals. They are boiled and served with sugar and butter. The most important famine plants remembered by people are the aerial bulbils of Persicaria vivipara. Flowers are used as children's snacks - their nectar is sucked. The number of wild taxa eaten in the studied valley is similar to that of other Tibetan areas. The structure of wild food plant taxa is also very typical for Tibetan speaking areas (e.g., the use of rhubarb shoots, Potentilla anserina, Persicaria vivipara). The studied community show a high level of mycophilia.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 15%
Other 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 12%
Environmental Science 2 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 8 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 November 2019.
All research outputs
#3,741,857
of 14,388,923 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#168
of 609 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#74,314
of 266,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,388,923 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 609 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them