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MR of neurocutaneous melanosis.

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, May 1994
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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119 Dimensions

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3 Mendeley
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Title
MR of neurocutaneous melanosis.
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, May 1994
Pubmed ID
Authors

Barkovich, A J, Frieden, I J, Williams, M L

Abstract

To describe the MR findings of neurocutaneous melanosis in the brain and correlate these with the known pathology and proposed embryologic basis of this disorder. The brain (seven patients) and spine (three patients) MR scans of seven patients with neurocutaneous melanosis were retrospectively reviewed. In two patients, findings were confirmed at surgery. The pattern of central nervous system involvement was also correlated with known pathologic studies regarding frequency and location of melanotic deposits. Five patients had regions of T1 shortening in the cerebellum; three of these also had T2 shortening. Five patients had regions of T1 shortening in the anterior temporal lobes. Other areas of involvement included the pia mater over the cerebellum (two patients), pons (one patient), medulla (one patient), and left parietal lobe (one patient). Only two lesions showed enhancement, edema, or necrosis; both were proved malignant melanomas at biopsy. No pial enhancement was detected. Neurocutaneous melanosis appears to involve the brain in specific locations that can be detected on MR imaging. Knowledge of these locations can aid in differentiating metastases, secondary to malignant degeneration of the large cutaneous nevi, from melanotic deposits that are a part of the disease. Identification of malignant degeneration of the melanotic deposits is difficult; at present, it depends on the identification of growth, edema, or necrosis of the deposits.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 67%
Researcher 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 1 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 33%
Unknown 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 June 2020.
All research outputs
#5,027,737
of 15,922,938 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#1,481
of 3,937 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,371
of 293,686 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#71
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,938 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,937 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 293,686 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.