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Polystyrene Particles Reveal Pore Substructure As They Translocate

Overview of attention for article published in ACS Nano, July 2012
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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1 X user
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8 patents

Citations

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64 Dimensions

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83 Mendeley
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3 CiteULike
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Title
Polystyrene Particles Reveal Pore Substructure As They Translocate
Published in
ACS Nano, July 2012
DOI 10.1021/nn302413u
Pubmed ID
Authors

Matthew Pevarnik, Ken Healy, Maria Eugenia Toimil-Molares, Alan Morrison, Sonia E. Létant, Zuzanna S. Siwy

Abstract

In this article, we report resistive-pulse sensing experiments with cylindrical track-etched PET pores, which reveal that the diameters of these pores fluctuate along their length. The resistive pulses generated by polymer spheres passing through these pores have a repeatable pattern of large variations corresponding to these diameter changes. We show that this pattern of variations enables the unambiguous resolution of multiple particles simultaneously in the pore, that it can detect transient sticking of particles within the pore, and that it can confirm whether any individual particle completely translocates the pore. We demonstrate that nonionic surfactant has a significant impact on particle velocity, with the velocity decreasing by an order of magnitude for a similar increase in surfactant concentration. We also show that these pores can differentiate by particle size and charge, and we explore the influence of electrophoresis, electroosmosis, and pore size on particle motion. These results have practical importance for increasing the speed of resistive-pulse sensing, optimizing the detection of specific analytes, and identifying particle shapes.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 X user who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
United States 2 2%
Germany 1 1%
New Zealand 1 1%
Korea, Republic of 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Unknown 74 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 30%
Researcher 13 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Student > Master 6 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 12 14%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 27 33%
Chemistry 11 13%
Engineering 11 13%
Materials Science 6 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 4%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 19 23%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2023.
All research outputs
#7,206,508
of 23,509,253 outputs
Outputs from ACS Nano
#6,456
of 13,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,994
of 165,473 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ACS Nano
#115
of 202 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,509,253 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,281 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 165,473 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 202 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.