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Is the Dissociative Experiences Scale able to identify detachment and compartmentalization symptoms? Factor structure of the Dissociative Experiences Scale in a large sample of psychiatric and…

Overview of attention for article published in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2016
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Is the Dissociative Experiences Scale able to identify detachment and compartmentalization symptoms? Factor structure of the Dissociative Experiences Scale in a large sample of psychiatric and nonpsychiatric subjects
Published in
Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, June 2016
DOI 10.2147/ndt.s105110
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claudio Imperatori, Eva Mazzotti, Benedetto Farina, Federica Mansutti, Elena Prunetti, Anna Maria Speranza, Claudio Barbaranelli

Abstract

In this study, we explored the ability of the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) to catch detachment and compartmentalization symptoms. The DES factor structure was evaluated in 768 psychiatric patients (546 women and 222 men) and in 2,403 subjects enrolled in nonpsychiatric settings (1,857 women and 546 men). All participants were administered the Italian version of DES. Twenty senior psychiatric experts in the treatment of dissociative symptoms independently assessed the DES items and categorized each of them as follows: "C" for compartmentalization, "D" for detachment, and "NC" for noncongruence with either C or D. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the three-factor structure of DES in both clinical and nonclinical samples and its invariance across the two groups. Moreover, factor analyses results overlapped with those from the expert classification procedure. Our results showed that DES can be used as a valid instrument for clinicians to assess the frequency of different types of dissociative experiences including detachment and compartmentalization.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 16%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Other 9 24%
Unknown 2 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 26 68%
Engineering 2 5%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 November 2020.
All research outputs
#4,950,072
of 17,601,811 outputs
Outputs from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#689
of 2,674 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,840
of 272,658 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
#33
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,601,811 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,674 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,658 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.