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Paracetamol for low back pain

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#43 of 10,585)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
461 tweeters
facebook
53 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
167 Mendeley
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Title
Paracetamol for low back pain
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, June 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd012230
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruno T Saragiotto, Gustavo C Machado, Manuela L Ferreira, Marina B Pinheiro, Christina Abdel Shaheed, Christopher G Maher

Abstract

Analgesic medication is the most frequently prescribed treatment for low back pain (LBP), of which paracetamol (acetaminophen) is recommended as the first choice medication. However, there is uncertainty about the efficacy of paracetamol for LBP. To investigate the efficacy and safety of paracetamol for non-specific LBP. We conducted searches on the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, which includes the Back and Neck Review Group trials register), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, Web of Science, LILACS, and IPA from their inception to 7 August 2015. We also searched the reference lists of eligible papers and trial registry websites (WHO ICTRP and ClinicalTrials.gov). We only considered randomised trials comparing the efficacy of paracetamol with placebo for non-specific LBP. The primary outcomes were pain and disability. We also investigated quality of life, function, adverse effects, global impression of recovery, sleep quality, patient adherence, and use of rescue medication as secondary outcomes. Two review authors independently performed the data extraction and assessed risk of bias in the included studies. We also evaluated the quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. We converted scales for pain intensity to a common 0 to 100 scale. We quantified treatment effects using mean difference for continuous outcomes and risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes. We used effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals as a measure of treatment effect for the primary outcomes. When the treatment effects were smaller than 9 points on a 0 to 100 scale, we considered the effect as small and not clinically important. Our searches retrieved 4449 records, of which three trials were included in the review (n = 1825 participants), and two trials were included in the meta-analysis. For acute LBP, there is high-quality evidence for no difference between paracetamol (4 g per day) and placebo at 1 week (immediate term), 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 12 weeks (short term) for the primary outcomes. There is high-quality evidence that paracetamol has no effect on quality of life, function, global impression of recovery, and sleep quality for all included time periods. There were also no significant differences between paracetamol and placebo for adverse events, patient adherence, or use of rescue medication. For chronic LBP, there is very low-quality evidence (based on a trial that has been retracted) for no effect of paracetamol (1 g single intravenous dose) on immediate pain reduction. Finally, no trials were identified evaluating patients with subacute LBP. We found that paracetamol does not produce better outcomes than placebo for people with acute LBP, and it is uncertain if it has any effect on chronic LBP.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 461 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 167 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 164 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 16%
Unspecified 24 14%
Student > Bachelor 24 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 13%
Other 21 13%
Other 49 29%
Unknown 1 <1%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 78 47%
Unspecified 33 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 9 5%
Psychology 8 5%
Other 23 14%
Unknown 1 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 451. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2019.
All research outputs
#19,803
of 13,407,638 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#43
of 10,585 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#981
of 265,970 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#2
of 164 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,407,638 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,585 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,970 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 164 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.