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Discrimination of human faces by archerfish (Toxotes chatareus)

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 50,773)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
156 news outlets
blogs
20 blogs
twitter
186 tweeters
facebook
18 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
5 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
69 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Discrimination of human faces by archerfish (Toxotes chatareus)
Published in
Scientific Reports, January 2016
DOI 10.1038/srep27523
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cait Newport, Guy Wallis, Yarema Reshitnyk, Ulrike E. Siebeck, Newport, Cait, Wallis, Guy, Reshitnyk, Yarema, Siebeck, Ulrike E

Abstract

Two rival theories of how humans recognize faces exist: (i) recognition is innate, relying on specialized neocortical circuitry, and (ii) recognition is a learned expertise, relying on general object recognition pathways. Here, we explore whether animals without a neocortex, can learn to recognize human faces. Human facial recognition has previously been demonstrated for birds, however they are now known to possess neocortex-like structures. Also, with much of the work done in domesticated pigeons, one cannot rule out the possibility that they have developed adaptations for human face recognition. Fish do not appear to possess neocortex-like cells, and given their lack of direct exposure to humans, are unlikely to have evolved any specialized capabilities for human facial recognition. Using a two-alternative forced-choice procedure, we show that archerfish (Toxotes chatareus) can learn to discriminate a large number of human face images (Experiment 1, 44 faces), even after controlling for colour, head-shape and brightness (Experiment 2, 18 faces). This study not only demonstrates that archerfish have impressive pattern discrimination abilities, but also provides evidence that a vertebrate lacking a neocortex and without an evolutionary prerogative to discriminate human faces, can nonetheless do so to a high degree of accuracy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 186 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
South Africa 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 64 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 23%
Researcher 16 23%
Student > Bachelor 10 14%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 29%
Unspecified 6 9%
Neuroscience 6 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Other 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1519. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2018.
All research outputs
#1,032
of 11,622,591 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#18
of 50,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#58
of 276,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#2
of 3,231 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,622,591 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 50,773 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,873 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,231 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.