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Tridimensional finite element analysis of teeth movement induced by different headgear forces

Overview of attention for article published in Progress in Orthodontics, June 2016
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6 Dimensions

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57 Mendeley
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Title
Tridimensional finite element analysis of teeth movement induced by different headgear forces
Published in
Progress in Orthodontics, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40510-016-0130-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ivan Toshio Maruo, Hiroshi Maruo, Armando Yukio Saga, Dauro Douglas de Oliveira, Marco André Argenta, Orlando Motohiro Tanaka

Abstract

This study aimed to simulate the actions of low-pull (LP), high-pull (HP), and combined pull (CP) headgears (HGs) and to analyze tooth movement tendencies through finite element analysis. Tomographic slices of a human maxilla with complete permanent dentition were processed by reconstruction software, and the triangular surface mesh was converted into non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) curves. An HG facial bow was also modulated in 3D. The teeth and bone were considered to have isotropic and linear behavior, whereas the periodontal ligament was considered to have non-linear and hyperelastic behavior. Data regarding the application points, directions and magnitudes of forces were obtained from the literature and from a dolichofacial patient with class II, division 1 malocclusion, who was treated with a CP HG. The CP HG promoted 37.1 to 41.1 %, and the HP HG promoted 19.1 to 31.9 % of LP distalization. The HP HG presented the highest intrusion, and the LP HG presented the highest extrusion of the first molar. The LP HG contracted the distal side, and the HP and CP HGs contracted the lingual and distobuccal roots of the second molar to a lesser degree. The LP HG promotes the greatest distalization, followed by the CP and HP HGs; the LP HG causes greater extrusion of the first molar, and the HP HG causes greater intrusion of the first molar. The LP HG causes greater contraction of the second molar than the HP HG.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 56 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 11 19%
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Other 5 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 14 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 47%
Engineering 7 12%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Chemistry 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 19 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,269,880
of 8,076,187 outputs
Outputs from Progress in Orthodontics
#68
of 124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#146,211
of 270,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Progress in Orthodontics
#6
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,076,187 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 124 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,604 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.