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Mitochondrial DNA reveals distinct evolutionary histories for Jewish populations in Yemen and Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Physical Anthropology, December 2010
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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46 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Mitochondrial DNA reveals distinct evolutionary histories for Jewish populations in Yemen and Ethiopia
Published in
American Journal of Physical Anthropology, December 2010
DOI 10.1002/ajpa.21360
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amy L. Non, Ali Al-Meeri, Ryan L. Raaum, Luisa F. Sanchez, Connie J. Mulligan

Abstract

Southern Arabia and the Horn of Africa are important geographic centers for the study of human population history because a great deal of migration has characterized these regions since the first emergence of humans out of Africa. Analysis of Jewish groups provides a unique opportunity to investigate more recent population histories in this area. Mitochondrial DNA is used to investigate the maternal evolutionary history and can be combined with historical and linguistic data to test various population histories. In this study, we assay mitochondrial control region DNA sequence and diagnostic coding variants in Yemenite (n = 45) and Ethiopian (n = 41) Jewish populations, as well as in neighboring non-Jewish Yemeni (n = 50) and Ethiopian (previously published Semitic speakers) populations. We investigate their population histories through a comparison of haplogroup distributions and phylogenetic networks. A high frequency of sub-Saharan African L haplogroups was found in both Jewish populations, indicating a significant African maternal contribution unlike other Jewish Diaspora populations. However, no identical haplotypes were shared between the Yemenite and Ethiopian Jewish populations, suggesting very little gene flow between the populations and potentially distinct maternal population histories. These new data are also used to investigate alternate population histories in the context of historical and linguistic data. Specifically, Yemenite Jewish mitochondrial diversity reflects potential descent from ancient Israeli exiles and shared African and Middle Eastern ancestry with little evidence for large-scale conversion of local Yemeni. In contrast, the Ethiopian Jewish population appears to be a subset of the larger Ethiopian population suggesting descent primarily through conversion of local women.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 7%
Unknown 43 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 41%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Master 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 4 9%
Professor 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 5 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 48%
Social Sciences 7 15%
Arts and Humanities 3 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 April 2021.
All research outputs
#1,683,037
of 17,405,806 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Physical Anthropology
#530
of 3,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,063
of 133,769 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Physical Anthropology
#9
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,405,806 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,075 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 133,769 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.