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Well-done red meat, metabolic phenotypes and colorectal cancer in Hawaii

Overview of attention for article published in Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis, September 2002
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 1,847)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
97 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
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Title
Well-done red meat, metabolic phenotypes and colorectal cancer in Hawaii
Published in
Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis, September 2002
DOI 10.1016/s0027-5107(02)00167-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Loı̈c Le Marchand, Jean H Hankin, Lisa M Pierce, Rashmi Sinha, Pratibha V Nerurkar, Adrian A Franke, Lynne R Wilkens, Laurence N Kolonel, Timothy Donlon, Ann Seifried, Laurie J Custer, Annette Lum-Jones, Wendy Chang

Abstract

Heterocyclic amines (HAAs) and polycyclic hydrocarbons are suspected colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogens that are found in well-done meat. They require metabolic activation by phase I enzymes, such as the smoking-inducible CYP1A isoenzymes. N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) also play a role in the further activation of HAAs. We conducted a population-based case-control study in Hawaii to test the associations of preference for well-done red meat and HAA intake with colon and rectal cancers, as well as the modifying effects of NAT2 and CYP1A2. We interviewed 727 Japanese, Caucasian or Native Hawaiian cases and 727 controls matched on sex, age, and ethnicity. HAA intake was estimated based on consumption of meat and fish for each of several cooking methods and doneness levels. A subgroup of 349 cases and 467 controls was phenotyped for CYP1A2 by a caffeine test. We found that preference for well-done red meat was associated with a 8.8-fold increased risk of CRC (95% CI: 1.7-44.9) among ever-smokers with the NAT2 and CYP1A2 rapid phenotypes, compared to ever-smokers with low NAT2 and CYP1A2 activities and who preferred their red meat rare or medium. A dose-dependent association was also found between the HAA intake estimates and male rectal cancer, with a two- to three-fold increase in risk from the low (T(1)) to high (T(3)) tertile of intake for each HAA. This association was strongest for MeIQx. HAA intake was not associated with male colon cancer or colon or rectal cancer in women. These data provide support to the hypothesis that exposure to pyrolysis products through consumption of well-done meat increases the risk of CRC, particularly in individuals who smoke and are genetically susceptible (as determined by a rapid phenotype for both NAT2 and CYP1A2). An attempt to examine the risk associated with specific HAAs suggested that the main HAAs increase risk of rectal cancer in men and that they do not appreciably affect risk of rectal cancer in women or of colon cancer in either sex.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 7%
United Kingdom 1 2%
France 1 2%
Unknown 41 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 24%
Unspecified 7 15%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Other 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 22%
Unspecified 10 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 9%
Other 11 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 April 2019.
All research outputs
#1,256,380
of 13,610,713 outputs
Outputs from Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis
#47
of 1,847 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,300
of 122,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,610,713 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,847 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 122,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them