↓ Skip to main content

How Multivariate Ejaculate Traits Determine Competitive Fertilization Success in Drosophila melanogaster

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, July 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (72nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
How Multivariate Ejaculate Traits Determine Competitive Fertilization Success in Drosophila melanogaster
Published in
Current Biology, July 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2012.06.059
Pubmed ID
Authors

Scott Pitnick

Abstract

Success in sperm competition, occurring whenever females mate with multiple males, is predicted to be influenced by variation in ejaculate quality and interactions among competing sperm. Yet, apart from sperm number, relevant ejaculate characteristics and sperm-sperm interactions are poorly understood, particularly within a multivariate framework and the natural selective environment of the female reproductive tract. Here, we used isogenic lines of Drosophila melanogaster with distinguishable sperm to demonstrate and partition genetic variation in multiple sperm quality and performance traits. Next, by competing males from different lines, we show how rival sperm significantly influence each other's velocity and reveal that males with relatively slow and/or long sperm better displace rival sperm and resist displacement, thus avoiding ejection by the female from her reproductive tract. Finally, we establish fitness consequences of genetic variation in sperm quality and its role in securing a numerical advantage in storage by showing that offspring paternity is determined strictly by the representation of stored, competing sperm. These results provide novel insight into complex postcopulatory processes, illustrate that different ejaculate traits are critical at different biologically relevant time-points, and provide a critical foundation for elucidating the role of postcopulatory sexual selection in trait diversification and speciation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Switzerland 1 1%
United Kingdom 1 1%
Mexico 1 1%
Unknown 79 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 31%
Researcher 18 21%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Student > Master 9 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 15 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 67 80%
Unspecified 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Engineering 2 2%
Environmental Science 1 1%
Other 3 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 March 2013.
All research outputs
#748,824
of 8,006,495 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#2,087
of 6,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,946
of 94,621 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#26
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,006,495 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,794 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 94,621 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.