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The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 3,304)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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Readers on

mendeley
341 Mendeley
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4 CiteULike
Title
The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness
Published in
Science Advances, June 2016
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1600377
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabio Falchi, Pierantonio Cinzano, Dan Duriscoe, Christopher C. M. Kyba, Christopher D. Elvidge, Kimberly Baugh, Boris A. Portnov, Nataliya A. Rybnikova, Riccardo Furgoni

Abstract

Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution-artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world's land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 1,528 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 341 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
United States 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Austria 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 329 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 66 19%
Researcher 59 17%
Student > Master 57 17%
Student > Bachelor 55 16%
Unspecified 25 7%
Other 79 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 105 31%
Environmental Science 56 16%
Unspecified 48 14%
Physics and Astronomy 41 12%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 24 7%
Other 67 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3980. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2019.
All research outputs
#119
of 13,528,338 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#3
of 3,304 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5
of 264,630 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#1
of 116 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,528,338 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,304 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 122.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,630 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 116 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.