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Rapid identification of fungi in culture-negative clinical blood and respiratory samples by DNA sequence analyses

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
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Title
Rapid identification of fungi in culture-negative clinical blood and respiratory samples by DNA sequence analyses
Published in
BMC Research Notes, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13104-016-2097-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Farida Sidiq, Matt Hoostal, Scott O. Rogers

Abstract

Clinical diagnoses of fungal infections often rely upon culture techniques followed by microscopic examination of positive cultures and histopathological specimens. Culturing of microorganisms is prone to false negatives, while microscopy methods can be complicated by atypical phenotypes and organisms that are morphologically indistinguishable in tissues. Delays in diagnoses (or the lack thereof) and inaccurate identification of infectious organisms contribute to increased morbidity and mortality in patients. Two-hundred randomized, heterogeneous patient blood and respiratory samples that were culture-negative were tested using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of internal transcribed spacer regions of ribosomal RNA genes utilizing panfungal primers. Amplicons were sequenced, subjected to sequence similarity searches, and compared using phylogenetic analyses. Thirteen fungal sequences were detected in three whole-blood samples and nine respiratory samples. Bioinformatic analyses were performed which indicated the presence of multiple pathogens and potential pathogens. The results from this pilot study demonstrate the utility of PCR assays and sequence analyses in clinical tests for fungi to facilitate rapid diagnosis and appropriate treatments to deal with the false negatives from culture results.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Lecturer 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 7 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 45%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 20%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 4 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 June 2016.
All research outputs
#1,039,378
of 7,879,571 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#216
of 1,929 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,229
of 268,520 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#13
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,879,571 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,929 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,520 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.