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Ivermectin Induces Cytostatic Autophagy by Blocking the PAK1/Akt Axis in Breast Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 17,495)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
968 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
143 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
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Title
Ivermectin Induces Cytostatic Autophagy by Blocking the PAK1/Akt Axis in Breast Cancer
Published in
Cancer Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-15-2887
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qianhui Dou, Hai-Ning Chen, Kui Wang, Kefei Yuan, Yunlong Lei, Kai Li, Jiang Lan, Yan Chen, Zhao Huang, Na Xie, Lu Zhang, Rong Xiang, Edouard C. Nice, Yuquan Wei, Canhua Huang

Abstract

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide yet successful treatment remains a clinical challenge. Ivermectin, a broad-spectrum antiparasitic drug, has recently been characterized as a potential anticancer agent due to observed anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Here, we report a role for ivermectin in breast cancer suppression by activating cytostatic autophagy both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, ivermectin-induced autophagy in breast cancer cells is associated with decreased P21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) expression via the ubiquitination-mediated degradation pathway. The inhibition of PAK1 decreases the phosphorylation level of Akt, resulting in the blockade of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. In breast cancer xenografts, the ivermectin-induced cytostatic autophagy leads to suppression of tumor growth. Together, our results provide a molecular basis for the use of ivermectin to inhibit the proliferation of breast cancer cells, and indicate that ivermectin is a potential option for the treatment of breast cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 968 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 12%
Student > Master 11 12%
Student > Bachelor 11 12%
Researcher 10 11%
Student > Postgraduate 10 11%
Other 20 21%
Unknown 21 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 12%
Chemistry 7 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 3%
Other 13 14%
Unknown 30 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 722. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 August 2022.
All research outputs
#20,907
of 21,795,229 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#8
of 17,495 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#445
of 281,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#1
of 492 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,795,229 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 17,495 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,120 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 492 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.