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Mast cell depletion in the preclinical phase of collagen-induced arthritis reduces clinical outcome by lowering the inflammatory cytokine profile

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, June 2016
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Title
Mast cell depletion in the preclinical phase of collagen-induced arthritis reduces clinical outcome by lowering the inflammatory cytokine profile
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13075-016-1036-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniël van der Velden, H. Maxime Lagraauw, Anouk Wezel, Pierre Launay, Johan Kuiper, Tom W. J. Huizinga, René E. M. Toes, Ilze Bot, Jeroen N. Stoop

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease, which is characterized by inflammation of synovial joints leading to the destruction of cartilage and bone. Infiltrating mast cells can be found within the inflamed synovial tissue, however their role in disease pathogenesis is unclear. Therefore we have studied the role of mast cells during different phases of experimental arthritis. We induced collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), the most frequently used animal model of arthritis, in an inducible mast cell knock-out mouse and determined the effect of mast cell depletion on the development and severity of arthritis. Depletion of mast cells in established arthritis did not affect clinical outcome. However, depletion of mast cells during the preclinical phase resulted in a significant reduction in arthritis. This reduction coincided with a decrease in circulating CD4(+) T cells and inflammatory monocytes but not in the collagen-specific antibody levels. Mast cell depletion resulted in reduced levels of IL-6 and IL-17 in serum. Furthermore, stimulation of splenocytes from mast cell-depleted mice with collagen type II resulted in reduced levels of IL-17 and enhanced production of IL-10. Here we show that mast cells contribute to the preclinical phase of CIA. Depletion of mast cells before disease onset resulted in an altered collagen-specific T cell and cytokine response. These data may suggest that mast cells play a role in the regulation of the adaptive immune response during the development of arthritis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 35%
Researcher 4 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 17%
Unspecified 1 4%
Professor 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 6 26%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 13%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2016.
All research outputs
#11,085,630
of 13,967,998 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,891
of 2,249 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,515
of 222,258 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,967,998 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,249 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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