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Tamoxifen, Flaxseed, and the Lignan Enterolactone Increase Stroma- and Cancer Cell–Derived IL-1Ra and Decrease Tumor Angiogenesis in Estrogen-Dependent Breast Cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Research, November 2010
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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42 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Tamoxifen, Flaxseed, and the Lignan Enterolactone Increase Stroma- and Cancer Cell–Derived IL-1Ra and Decrease Tumor Angiogenesis in Estrogen-Dependent Breast Cancer
Published in
Cancer Research, November 2010
DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.can-10-2289
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lindahl G, Saarinen N, Abrahamsson A, Dabrosin C, Gabriel Lindahl, Niina Saarinen, Annelie Abrahamsson, Charlotta Dabrosin

Abstract

The proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α and IL-1β promote tumor angiogenesis that might be counteracted by the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), anakinra, a clinically approved agent. A diet with high amounts of phytoestrogens, such as flaxseed (Flax), genistein (GEN), and the mammalian lignan enterolactone (ENL), may affect breast cancer progression in a similar fashion as the antiestrogen tamoxifen. Both cancer cells and tumor stroma may be targets for cancer therapy. By using microdialysis in a model of human breast cancers in nude mice, we could perform species-specific analyses of released proteins in the microenvironment. We show that tumors treated with tamoxifen and fed Flax or ENL exhibited decreased in vivo release of IL-1β derived from the murine stroma and decreased microvessel density whereas dietary GEN had no effects. Cancer cell-released IL-1Ra were approximately 5 times higher than stroma-derived IL-1Ra. Tamoxifen, Flax, and ENL increased IL-1Ra levels significantly whereas GEN did not. The tumor stroma contained macrophages, which expressed the estrogen receptor. In vitro, estradiol decreased IL-1Ra released from breast cancer cells and from cultured macrophages. IL-1Ra decreased endothelial cell proliferation significantly in vitro whereas breast cancer cell proliferation was unaffected in presence of estradiol. Finally, IL-1Ra therapy of tumor-bearing mice opposed estrogen-dependent breast cancer growth and decreased angiogenesis. We conclude that the release of IL-1s both by cancer cells and the stroma, where macrophages are a key component, may offer feasible targets for antiestrogen therapy and dietary interventions against breast cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
France 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 34 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 30%
Researcher 8 22%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Unspecified 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 5%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 June 2018.
All research outputs
#5,809,241
of 11,530,016 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Research
#8,065
of 12,049 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,251
of 111,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Research
#23
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,530,016 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,049 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 111,951 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.