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On the sustainability of inland fisheries: Finding a future for the forgotten

Overview of attention for article published in AMBIO - A Journal of the Human Environment, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
22 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
155 Mendeley
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Title
On the sustainability of inland fisheries: Finding a future for the forgotten
Published in
AMBIO - A Journal of the Human Environment, June 2016
DOI 10.1007/s13280-016-0787-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Steven J. Cooke, Edward H. Allison, T. Douglas Beard, Robert Arlinghaus, Angela H. Arthington, Devin M. Bartley, Ian G. Cowx, Carlos Fuentevilla, Nancy J. Leonard, Kai Lorenzen, Abigail J. Lynch, Vivian M. Nguyen, So-Jung Youn, William W. Taylor, Robin L. Welcomme

Abstract

At present, inland fisheries are not often a national or regional governance priority and as a result, inland capture fisheries are undervalued and largely overlooked. As such they are threatened in both developing and developed countries. Indeed, due to lack of reliable data, inland fisheries have never been part of any high profile global fisheries assessment and are notably absent from the Sustainable Development Goals. The general public and policy makers are largely ignorant of the plight of freshwater ecosystems and the fish they support, as well as the ecosystem services generated by inland fisheries. This ignorance is particularly salient given that the current emphasis on the food-water-energy nexus often fails to include the important role that inland fish and fisheries play in food security and supporting livelihoods in low-income food deficit countries. Developing countries in Africa and Asia produce about 11 million tonnes of inland fish annually, 90 % of the global total. The role of inland fisheries goes beyond just kilocalories; fish provide important micronutrients and essentially fatty acids. In some regions, inland recreational fisheries are important, generating much wealth and supporting livelihoods. The following three key recommendations are necessary for action if inland fisheries are to become a part of the food-water-energy discussion: invest in improved valuation and assessment methods, build better methods to effectively govern inland fisheries (requires capacity building and incentives), and develop approaches to managing waters across sectors and scales. Moreover, if inland fisheries are recognized as important to food security, livelihoods, and human well-being, they can be more easily incorporated in regional, national, and global policies and agreements on water issues. Through these approaches, inland fisheries can be better evaluated and be more fully recognized in broader water resource and aquatic ecosystem planning and decision-making frameworks, enhancing their value and sustainability for the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 155 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Brazil 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 150 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 24%
Researcher 34 22%
Student > Master 23 15%
Unspecified 21 14%
Other 7 5%
Other 33 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 47 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 45 29%
Unspecified 30 19%
Social Sciences 14 9%
Engineering 5 3%
Other 14 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2019.
All research outputs
#552,013
of 12,867,507 outputs
Outputs from AMBIO - A Journal of the Human Environment
#60
of 880 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,968
of 261,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age from AMBIO - A Journal of the Human Environment
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,867,507 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 880 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,470 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them