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A metagenomic study of methanotrophic microorganisms in Coal Oil Point seep sediments

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, January 2011
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Title
A metagenomic study of methanotrophic microorganisms in Coal Oil Point seep sediments
Published in
BMC Microbiology, January 2011
DOI 10.1186/1471-2180-11-221
Pubmed ID
Authors

Othilde Håvelsrud, Thomas HA Haverkamp, Tom Kristensen, Kjetill S Jakobsen, Anne Rike

Abstract

Methane oxidizing prokaryotes in marine sediments are believed to function as a methane filter reducing the oceanic contribution to the global methane emission. In the anoxic parts of the sediments, oxidation of methane is accomplished by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) living in syntrophy with sulphate reducing bacteria. This anaerobic oxidation of methane is assumed to be a coupling of reversed methanogenesis and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. Where oxygen is available aerobic methanotrophs take part in methane oxidation. In this study, we used metagenomics to characterize the taxonomic and metabolic potential for methane oxidation at the Tonya seep in the Coal Oil Point area, California. Two metagenomes from different sediment depth horizons (0-4 cm and 10-15 cm below sea floor) were sequenced by 454 technology. The metagenomes were analysed to characterize the distribution of aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophic taxa at the two sediment depths. To gain insight into the metabolic potential the metagenomes were searched for marker genes associated with methane oxidation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 137 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 5 4%
Mexico 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Korea, Republic of 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 119 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 27%
Researcher 33 24%
Student > Master 23 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 4%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 4%
Other 21 15%
Unknown 11 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 72 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 11%
Environmental Science 14 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 4%
Computer Science 5 4%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 10 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 August 2012.
All research outputs
#3,335,954
of 4,703,378 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#675
of 943 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,857
of 77,011 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#27
of 47 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,703,378 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 943 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 77,011 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 47 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.