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Disruption of the Golgi protein Otg1 gene causes defective hormone secretion and aberrant glucose homeostasis in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Cell & Bioscience, June 2016
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Title
Disruption of the Golgi protein Otg1 gene causes defective hormone secretion and aberrant glucose homeostasis in mice
Published in
Cell & Bioscience, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13578-016-0108-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guangxue Wang, Rongbo Li, Ying Yang, Liang Cai, Sheng Ding, Tian Xu, Min Han, Xiaohui Wu, Wang, Guangxue, Li, Rongbo, Yang, Ying, Cai, Liang, Ding, Sheng, Xu, Tian, Han, Min, Wu, Xiaohui

Abstract

Concerted hormone secretion is essential for glucose homeostasis and growth. The oocyte testis gene 1 (Otg1) has limited information in mammals before. Human OTG1 has been identified as an antigen associated with cutaneous T cell lymphoma, while worm Otg1 is recently reported to be a vesicle trafficking regulator in neurons. To understand the physiological role of Otg1 and its potential relation to hormone secretion, we characterized a mutation caused by the piggyBac transposon (PB) insertion in mice. Oocyte testis gene 1 encodes a Golgi localized protein that is expressed with a broad tissue distribution in mice. The PB insertion effectively blocks Otg1 expression, which results in postnatal lethality, growth retardation, hypoglycemia and improved insulin sensitivity in mice. Otg1 mutants exhibit decreased levels of insulin, leptin and growth hormone in the circulation and reduced hepatic IGF-1 expression. Decreased expression of Otg1 in pituitary GH3 cells causes reduced grow hormone expression and secretion, as well as the traffic of the VSVG protein marker. Our data support the hypothesis that Otg1 impacts hormone secretion by regulating vesicle trafficking. These results revealed a previously unknown and important role of Otg1 in hormone secretion and glucose homeostasis in mammals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 14%
Unknown 6 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 29%
Unspecified 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Unknown 2 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 29%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 14%
Unspecified 1 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 14%
Unknown 2 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2016.
All research outputs
#10,122,246
of 13,254,778 outputs
Outputs from Cell & Bioscience
#161
of 314 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,400
of 263,056 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cell & Bioscience
#7
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,254,778 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 314 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.