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Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon

Overview of attention for article published in General & Comparative Endocrinology, November 2012
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1 tweeter

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Estrogenic compounds decrease growth hormone receptor abundance and alter osmoregulation in Atlantic salmon
Published in
General & Comparative Endocrinology, November 2012
DOI 10.1016/j.ygcen.2012.08.001
Pubmed ID
Authors

Darren T. Lerner, Mark A. Sheridan, Stephen D. McCormick

Abstract

Exposure of Atlantic salmon smolts to estrogenic compounds is shown to compromise several aspects of smolt development. We sought to determine the underlying endocrine mechanisms of estrogen impacts on the growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) axis. Smolts in freshwater (FW) were either injected 3 times over 10 days with 2 μgg(-1) 17β-estradiol (E2) or 150μgg(-1) 4-nonylphenol (NP). Seawater (SW)-acclimated fish received intraperitoneal implants of 30 μgg(-1) E2 over two weeks. Treatment with these estrogenic compounds increased hepatosomatic index and total plasma calcium. E2 and NP reduced maximum growth hormone binding by 30-60% in hepatic and branchial membranes in FW and SW, but did not alter the dissociation constant. E2 and NP treatment decreased plasma levels of IGF-I levels in both FW and SW. In FW E2 and NP decreased plasma GH whereas in SW plasma GH increased after E2 treatment. Compared to controls, plasma chloride concentrations of E2-treated fish were decreased 5.5mM in FW and increased 10.5mM in SW. There was no effect of NP or E2 on gill sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase) activity in FW smolts, whereas E2 treatment in SW reduced gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity and altered the number and size of ionocytes. Our data indicate that E2 downregulates the GH/IGF-I-axis and SW tolerance which may be part of its normal function for reproduction and movement into FW. We conclude that the mechanism of endocrine disruption of smolt development by NP is in part through alteration of the GH/IGF-I axis via reduced GH receptor abundance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 45 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 24%
Student > Master 9 20%
Professor 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 3 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 52%
Environmental Science 6 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 13%
Mathematics 1 2%
Chemical Engineering 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 6 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2012.
All research outputs
#7,629,148
of 12,206,093 outputs
Outputs from General & Comparative Endocrinology
#622
of 1,207 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#69,683
of 121,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age from General & Comparative Endocrinology
#6
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,206,093 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,207 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.7. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 121,548 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.