↓ Skip to main content

The spatiotemporal hemodynamic response function for depth-dependent functional imaging of human cortex

Overview of attention for article published in NeuroImage, October 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
16 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The spatiotemporal hemodynamic response function for depth-dependent functional imaging of human cortex
Published in
NeuroImage, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.06.019
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander M. Puckett, Kevin M. Aquino, P.A. Robinson, Michael Breakspear, Mark M. Schira

Abstract

The gray matter of human cortex is characterized by depth-dependent differences in neuronal activity and connections (Shipp, 2007) as well as in the associated vasculature (Duvernoy et al., 1981). The resolution limit of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements is now below a millimeter, promising the non-invasive measurement of these properties in awake and behaving humans (Muckli et al. 2015; Olman et al. 2012; Ress et al. 2007). To advance this endeavor, we present a detailed spatiotemporal hemodynamic response function (HRF) reconstructed through the use of high-resolution, submillimeter fMRI. We decomposed the HRF into directions tangential and perpendicular to the cortical surface and found that key spatial properties of the HRF change significantly with depth from the cortical surface. Notably, we found that the spatial spread of the HRF increases linearly from 4.8mm at the gray/white matter boundary to 6.6mm near the cortical surface. Using a hemodynamic model, we posit that this effect can be explained by the depth profile of the cortical vasculature, and as such, must be taken into account to properly estimate the underlying neuronal responses at different cortical depths.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 5%
Israel 1 3%
Unknown 37 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 23%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Other 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 12 30%
Unspecified 8 20%
Physics and Astronomy 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Other 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 December 2017.
All research outputs
#1,238,274
of 12,298,022 outputs
Outputs from NeuroImage
#1,403
of 7,502 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,988
of 271,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age from NeuroImage
#41
of 178 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,298,022 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,502 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,327 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 178 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.