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Large herbivores surf waves of green-up during spring

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (84th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
193 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
360 Mendeley
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Title
Large herbivores surf waves of green-up during spring
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, June 2016
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2016.0456
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jerod A. Merkle, Kevin L. Monteith, Ellen O. Aikens, Matthew M. Hayes, Kent R. Hersey, Arthur D. Middleton, Brendan A. Oates, Hall Sawyer, Brandon M. Scurlock, Matthew J. Kauffman

Abstract

The green wave hypothesis (GWH) states that migrating animals should track or 'surf' high-quality forage at the leading edge of spring green-up. To index such high-quality forage, recent work proposed the instantaneous rate of green-up (IRG), i.e. rate of change in the normalized difference vegetation index over time. Despite this important advancement, no study has tested the assumption that herbivores select habitat patches at peak IRG. We evaluated this assumption using step selection functions parametrized with movement data during the green-up period from two populations each of bighorn sheep, mule deer, elk, moose and bison, totalling 463 individuals monitored 1-3 years from 2004 to 2014. Accounting for variables that typically influence habitat selection for each species, we found seven of 10 populations selected patches exhibiting high IRG-supporting the GWH. Nonetheless, large herbivores selected for the leading edge, trailing edge and crest of the IRG wave, indicating that other mechanisms (e.g. ruminant physiology) or measurement error inherent with satellite data affect selection for IRG. Our evaluation indicates that IRG is a useful tool for linking herbivore movement with plant phenology, paving the way for significant advancements in understanding how animals track resource quality that varies both spatially and temporally.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 360 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 356 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 72 20%
Researcher 66 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 62 17%
Student > Bachelor 35 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 4%
Other 42 12%
Unknown 70 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 164 46%
Environmental Science 80 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 3%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 1%
Unspecified 4 1%
Other 12 3%
Unknown 85 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 July 2016.
All research outputs
#2,888,580
of 22,879,161 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#5,017
of 9,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,387
of 352,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#58
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,879,161 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,886 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.5. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,006 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.