↓ Skip to main content

Reasons to avoid vitamin D deficiency during COVID-19 pandemic

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism, August 2020
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 221)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
Title
Reasons to avoid vitamin D deficiency during COVID-19 pandemic
Published in
Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism, August 2020
DOI 10.20945/2359-3997000000291
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rodrigo Nolasco dos Santos, Sergio Setsuo Maeda, José Roberto Jardim, Marise Lazaretti-Castro

Abstract

The effects of vitamin D on the musculoskeletal system are well established. Its deficiency causes osteomalacia, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and an increased risk for fractures and falls. However, clinical and experimental evidence points to extra-skeletal actions of vitamin D, including on immune and respiratory systems. Thus, during this COVID-19 pandemic, a possible deleterious role of vitamin D deficiency has been questioned. This paper aims to present a brief review of the literature and discuss, based on evidence, the role of vitamin D in the lung function and in the prevention of respiratory infections. Relevant articles were searched in the databases MEDLINE/PubMed and SciELO/LILACS. The mechanisms of vitamin D action in the immune system response will be discussed. Clinical data from systematic reviews and meta-analyses show benefits in the prevention of respiratory infections and improvement of pulmonary function when vitamin D-deficient patients are supplemented. At the time of writing this paper, no published data on vitamin D supplementation for patients with COVID-19 have been found. Vitamin D supplementation is recommended during this period of social isolation to avoid any deficiency, especially in the context of bone outcomes, aiming to achieve normal values of 25(OH)D. The prevention of respiratory infections and improvement of pulmonary function are additional benefits observed when vitamin D deficiency is treated. Thus far, any protective effect of vitamin D specifically against severe COVID-19 remains unclear. We also emphasize avoiding bolus or extremely high doses of vitamin D, which can increase the risk of intoxication without evidence of benefits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 127 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 14%
Student > Bachelor 17 13%
Other 8 6%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Student > Master 7 6%
Other 27 21%
Unknown 43 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 28%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 6%
Unspecified 6 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 19 15%
Unknown 46 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2021.
All research outputs
#1,064,314
of 21,001,073 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism
#5
of 221 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,512
of 317,953 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism
#1
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,001,073 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 221 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,953 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them