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Engaging indigenous and academic knowledge on bees in the Amazon: implications for environmental management and transdisciplinary research

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 650)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
policy
1 policy source
twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
15 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
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Title
Engaging indigenous and academic knowledge on bees in the Amazon: implications for environmental management and transdisciplinary research
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13002-016-0093-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simone Athayde, John Richard Stepp, Wemerson C. Ballester

Abstract

This paper contributes to the development of theoretical and methodological approaches that aim to engage indigenous, technical and academic knowledge for environmental management. We present an exploratory analysis of a transdisciplinary project carried out to identify and contrast indigenous and academic perspectives on the relationship between the Africanized honey bee and stingless bee species in the Brazilian Amazon. The project was developed by practitioners and researchers of the Instituto Socioambiental (ISA, a Brazilian NGO), responding to a concern raised by a funding agency, regarding the potential impact of apiculture development by indigenous peoples, on the diversity of stingless bee species in the Xingu Park, southern Brazilian Amazon. Research and educational activities were carried out among four indigenous peoples: Kawaiwete or Kaiabi, Yudja or Juruna, Kīsêdjê or Suyá and Ikpeng or Txicão. A constructivist qualitative approach was developed, which included academic literature review, conduction of semi-structured interviews with elders and leaders, community focus groups, field walks and workshops in schools in four villages. Semi-structured interviews and on-line surveys were carried out among academic experts and practitioners. We found that in both indigenous and scientific perspectives, diversity is a key aspect in keeping exotic and native species in balance and thus avoiding heightened competition and extinction. The Africanized honey bee was compared to the non-indigenous westerners who colonized the Americas, with whom indigenous peoples had to learn to coexist. We identify challenges and opportunities for engagement of indigenous and scientific knowledge for research and management of bee species in the Amazon. A combination of small-scale apiculture and meliponiculture is viewed as an approach that might help to maintain biological and cultural diversity in Amazonian landscapes. The articulation of knowledge from non-indigenous practitioners and researchers with that of indigenous peoples might inform sustainable management practices that are, at the same time, respectful of indigenous perspectives and intellectual property rights. However, there are ontological, epistemological, political and financial barriers and constraints that need to be addressed in transdisciplinary research projects inter-relating academic, technical and indigenous knowledge systems for environmental management.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 <1%
Unknown 114 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 25 22%
Researcher 17 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Other 24 21%
Unknown 18 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 23%
Environmental Science 25 22%
Social Sciences 15 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 3%
Other 17 15%
Unknown 23 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2020.
All research outputs
#832,818
of 16,292,814 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#13
of 650 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,430
of 265,323 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,292,814 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 650 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,323 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them