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Psychotic spectrum symptoms across the lifespan are related to lifetime suicidality among 147 patients with bipolar I or major depressive disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of General Psychiatry, June 2016
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Title
Psychotic spectrum symptoms across the lifespan are related to lifetime suicidality among 147 patients with bipolar I or major depressive disorder
Published in
Annals of General Psychiatry, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12991-016-0101-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Camilla Gesi, Claudia Carmassi, Mario Miniati, Antonella Benvenuti, Gabriele Massimetti, Liliana Dell’Osso

Abstract

Conflicting evidence exists about the relationship between psychotic symptoms and suicidality in mood disorders. We aimed to investigate the lifetime suicidality and its relationship with dimensions of the psychotic spectrum over the lifespan among subjects with bipolar I (BD I) or major depressive disorder (MDD). 147 Consecutive out- and inpatients with BD I or MDD presenting for treatment at 11 Italian Departments of Psychiatry were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, the Structured Clinical Interview for the Psychotic Spectrum (SCI-PSY, lifetime version) and the Mood Spectrum Self-Report (MOODS-SR, lifetime version). Subjects with psychotic features did not differ from those without for MOODS-SR suicidality score. Controlling for age, gender and diagnosis (MDD/BD I), the SCI-PSY total score (p = .007) and Paranoid (p = .042), Schizoid (p = .007) and Interpersonal Sensitivity (p < .001) domain scores independently predicted lifetime MOODS-SR suicidality score in the overall sample. Psychotic features, as evaluated upon the presence of delusions or hallucinations, are not associated with suicidality among subjects with BD I or MDD. However, more subtle dimensions of the psychotic spectrum, such as Interpersonal Sensitivity, Paranoid and Schizoid symptoms, show a significant relationship with lifetime suicidality. Our findings highlight the potential usefulness of a spectrum approach in the assessment of psychotic symptoms and suicide risk among subjects with BD I or MDD.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Unknown 41 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Other 11 26%
Unknown 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 14 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 17%
Neuroscience 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 9 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2016.
All research outputs
#5,736,153
of 7,940,332 outputs
Outputs from Annals of General Psychiatry
#178
of 259 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#168,439
of 262,339 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of General Psychiatry
#4
of 4 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 259 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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