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Adaptive management for soil ecosystem services

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Management, December 2016
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
250 Mendeley
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Title
Adaptive management for soil ecosystem services
Published in
Journal of Environmental Management, December 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.jenvman.2016.06.024
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah E. Birgé, Rebecca A. Bevans, Craig R. Allen, David G. Angeler, Sara G. Baer, Diana H. Wall

Abstract

Ecosystem services provided by soil include regulation of the atmosphere and climate, primary (including agricultural) production, waste processing, decomposition, nutrient conservation, water purification, erosion control, medical resources, pest control, and disease mitigation. The simultaneous production of these multiple services arises from complex interactions among diverse aboveground and belowground communities across multiple scales. When a system is mismanaged, non-linear and persistent losses in ecosystem services can arise. Adaptive management is an approach to management designed to reduce uncertainty as management proceeds. By developing alternative hypotheses, testing these hypotheses and adjusting management in response to outcomes, managers can probe dynamic mechanistic relationships among aboveground and belowground soil system components. In doing so, soil ecosystem services can be preserved and critical ecological thresholds avoided. Here, we present an adaptive management framework designed to reduce uncertainty surrounding the soil system, even when soil ecosystem services production is not the explicit management objective, so that managers can reach their management goals without undermining soil multifunctionality or contributing to an irreversible loss of soil ecosystem services.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 250 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 2%
Australia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Finland 1 <1%
Unknown 241 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 50 20%
Student > Master 44 18%
Researcher 40 16%
Student > Bachelor 18 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 5%
Other 42 17%
Unknown 43 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 68 27%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 24%
Unspecified 13 5%
Social Sciences 6 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 2%
Other 33 13%
Unknown 63 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 June 2016.
All research outputs
#15,379,002
of 22,879,161 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Management
#3,332
of 5,373 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#250,749
of 416,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Management
#75
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,879,161 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,373 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 24th percentile – i.e., 24% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 416,418 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.