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Genetic reconstruction of a bullfrog invasion to elucidate vectors of introduction and secondary spread

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, June 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

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1 Facebook page

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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Title
Genetic reconstruction of a bullfrog invasion to elucidate vectors of introduction and secondary spread
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, June 2016
DOI 10.1002/ece3.2278
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kamath, Pauline L., Sepulveda, Adam J., Layhee, Megan, Kamath, Pauline L, Sepulveda, Adam J, Pauline L. Kamath, Adam J. Sepulveda, Megan Layhee

Abstract

Reconstructing historical colonization pathways of an invasive species is critical for uncovering factors that determine invasion success and for designing management strategies. The American bullfrog (Lithobates catesbeianus) is endemic to eastern North America, but now has a global distribution and is considered to be one of the worst invaders in the world. In Montana, several introduced populations have been reported, but little is known of their sources and vectors of introduction and secondary spread. We evaluated the genetic composition of introduced populations at local (Yellowstone River floodplain) and regional (Montana and Wyoming) scales in contrast to native range populations. Our objectives were to (1) estimate the number of introductions, (2) identify probable native sources, (3) evaluate genetic variation relative to sources, and (4) characterize properties of local- and regional-scale spread. We sequenced 937 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome b locus in 395 tadpoles collected along 100 km of the Yellowstone River, from three additional sites in MT and a proximate site in WY. Pairwise ΦST revealed high divergence among nonnative populations, suggesting at least four independent introductions into MT from diverse sources. Three cyt b haplotypes were identical to native haplotypes distributed across the Midwest and Great Lakes regions, and AMOVA confirmed the western native region as a likely source. While haplotype (H d = 0.69) and nucleotide diversity (π = 0.005) were low in introduced bullfrogs, the levels of diversity did not differ significantly from source populations. In the Yellowstone, two identified haplotypes implied few introduction vectors and a significant relationship between genetic and river distance was found. Evidence for multiple invasions and lack of subsequent regional spread emphasizes the importance of enforcing legislation prohibiting bullfrog importation and the need for continuing public education to prevent transport of bullfrogs in MT. More broadly, this study demonstrates how genetic approaches can reveal key properties of a biological invasion to inform management strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 5%
France 1 5%
Canada 1 5%
Unknown 19 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 18%
Student > Master 4 18%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Other 2 9%
Unspecified 2 9%
Other 7 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 59%
Environmental Science 5 23%
Unspecified 2 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2017.
All research outputs
#6,128,114
of 11,895,477 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#1,688
of 3,156 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,323
of 269,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#65
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,895,477 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,156 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,554 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.