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Do school teachers and primary contacts in residential youth care institutions recognize mental health problems in adolescents?

Overview of attention for article published in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, June 2016
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Title
Do school teachers and primary contacts in residential youth care institutions recognize mental health problems in adolescents?
Published in
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, June 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13034-016-0109-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Mari Undheim, Stian Lydersen, Nanna Sønnichsen Kayed

Abstract

Studies show that adolescents living in residential youth care (RYC) institutions experience more mental health problems than others. This paper studies how well teachers and primary contacts in RYC institutions recognize adolescents' mental health problems as classified by The Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment diagnostic interviews (CAPA). All residents between 12 and 23 years of age living in RYC institutions in Norway and enrolled in school at the time of data collection were invited to participate in the study. Of the 601 available children, 400 participated in the study, namely 230 girls, mean age = 16.9 years, SD = 1.2 and 170 boys, mean age = 16.5 years, SD = 1.5. The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Teacher's Report Form (TRF) were used. The sensitivity and specificity of these instruments were studied. We observed a significant gap between the mental health problems diagnosed by the CAPA interviews and the problems reported by primary contacts on the CBCL and by teachers on the TRF. The CBCL showed a higher sensitivity than the TRF, whereas the TRF showed a higher specificity than the CBCL. Both primary contacts and teachers classified externalizing problems fairly well such as ADHD in both genders and conduct disorder in girls. Both teachers and primary contacts, however, had more problems detecting internalizing problems. Teachers may have a tendency to view most students as healthy and to underestimate the severity of their problems, whereas primary contacts may tend to overestimate the number of problems and view adolescents as sicker than they really are. The Child Welfare System should revise their intake procedures to detect possible problems early on and to introduce the necessary treatment. It is important to identify factors that increase healthy school adaption in order for these adolescents to accomplish school in a proper way since education is important for a successful adult life.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 82 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 14%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 9 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 11%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 23 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 29 35%
Social Sciences 10 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Arts and Humanities 2 2%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 28 34%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2016.
All research outputs
#15,379,002
of 22,879,161 outputs
Outputs from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#488
of 659 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,006
of 352,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health
#8
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,879,161 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 659 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 352,012 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.