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The role of memory in posttraumatic stress disorder: implications for clinical practice

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, June 2016
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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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37 Mendeley
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Title
The role of memory in posttraumatic stress disorder: implications for clinical practice
Published in
Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, June 2016
DOI 10.1590/2237-6089-2014-0063
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marcelo Montagner Rigoli, Gustavo Ramos Silva, Fernando Rainho de Oliveira, Giovanni Kuckartz Pergher, Christian Haag Kristensen

Abstract

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a highly prevalent disorder with important social consequences. Several models have been developed with the aim of understanding the mechanisms underlying its symptoms. Intrusions are idiosyncratic symptoms that commonly take the form of involuntary recollection of images or flashbacks about the traumatic event. To review how memory is conceptualized in each of these models and the implications for clinical practice. A narrative review of the literature was conducted through analysis of the perspectives of memory in theoretical models of PTSD. Two main perspectives were identified: 1) models in which specific mechanisms of memory for processing traumatic events are proposed, especially those based on clinical studies, and 2) models in which common mnemonic mechanisms are utilized to explain the phenomenon, primarily based on basic experimental research studies investigating memory. The different theories based on these approaches have led to distinct psychotherapy interventions. In order to clarify these discrepancies, future research should aim for the methodological rigor of experimental studies, while maintaining the ecological applicability of findings. Cognitive experimental psychopathology is therefore an area on which research funding should be focused. Such studies could elucidate the role of mnemonic aspects in PTSD and how they impact psychological treatments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 22%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 14%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 16 43%
Neuroscience 6 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 January 2017.
All research outputs
#4,547,872
of 8,882,101 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#13
of 54 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#132,295
of 265,358 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#2
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,882,101 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 54 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,358 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.