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Science faculty's subtle gender biases favor male students

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 79,111)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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836 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
2620 Mendeley
citeulike
29 CiteULike
Title
Science faculty's subtle gender biases favor male students
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2012
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1211286109
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. A. Moss-Racusin, J. F. Dovidio, V. L. Brescoll, M. J. Graham, J. Handelsman

Abstract

Despite efforts to recruit and retain more women, a stark gender disparity persists within academic science. Abundant research has demonstrated gender bias in many demographic groups, but has yet to experimentally investigate whether science faculty exhibit a bias against female students that could contribute to the gender disparity in academic science. In a randomized double-blind study (n = 127), science faculty from research-intensive universities rated the application materials of a student-who was randomly assigned either a male or female name-for a laboratory manager position. Faculty participants rated the male applicant as significantly more competent and hireable than the (identical) female applicant. These participants also selected a higher starting salary and offered more career mentoring to the male applicant. The gender of the faculty participants did not affect responses, such that female and male faculty were equally likely to exhibit bias against the female student. Mediation analyses indicated that the female student was less likely to be hired because she was viewed as less competent. We also assessed faculty participants' preexisting subtle bias against women using a standard instrument and found that preexisting subtle bias against women played a moderating role, such that subtle bias against women was associated with less support for the female student, but was unrelated to reactions to the male student. These results suggest that interventions addressing faculty gender bias might advance the goal of increasing the participation of women in science.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4,362 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2,620 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 112 4%
United Kingdom 28 1%
Canada 23 <1%
Germany 17 <1%
Australia 9 <1%
Switzerland 9 <1%
France 8 <1%
Spain 5 <1%
Denmark 4 <1%
Other 34 1%
Unknown 2371 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 730 28%
Researcher 428 16%
Student > Bachelor 370 14%
Student > Master 274 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 173 7%
Other 645 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 583 22%
Psychology 492 19%
Social Sciences 353 13%
Unspecified 223 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 114 4%
Other 855 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4924. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2019.
All research outputs
#52
of 12,979,980 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#3
of 79,111 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1
of 127,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1
of 885 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,979,980 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 79,111 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 127,484 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 885 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.