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Laser-assisted cataract surgery versus standard ultrasound phacoemulsification cataract surgery

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

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Title
Laser-assisted cataract surgery versus standard ultrasound phacoemulsification cataract surgery
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2016
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010735.pub2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alexander C Day, Daniel M Gore, Catey Bunce, Jennifer R Evans

Abstract

Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world, and cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed operations in the Western world. Preferred surgical techniques have changed dramatically over the past half century with associated improvements in outcomes and safety. Femtosecond laser platforms that can accurately and reproducibly perform key steps in cataract surgery, including corneal incisions, capsulotomy and lens fragmentation, are now available. The potential advantages of laser-assisted surgery are broad, and include greater safety and better visual outcomes through greater precision and reproducibility. To compare the effectiveness of laser-assisted cataract surgery with standard ultrasound phacoemulsification cataract surgery by gathering evidence on safety from randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2016, Issue 4), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to May 2016), EMBASE (January 1980 to May 2016), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to May 2016), the ISRCTN registry (www.isrctn.com/editAdvancedSearch), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en) and the U.S. Food and Drugs Administration (FDA) website (www.fda.gov). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 10 May 2016. We included randomised controlled trials where laser-assisted cataract surgery was compared to standard ultrasound phacoemulsification cataract surgery. We graded the certainty of the evidence using GRADE. Two review authors independently screened the search results, assessed risk of bias and extracted data using the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcome for this review was intraoperative complications in the operated eye, namely anterior capsule and posterior capsule tears. The secondary outcomes were visual acuity (corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) and uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA)), refractive outcomes, quality of vision (as measured by any validated visual function score), postoperative complications and cost-effectiveness. We included 16 RCTs conducted in Germary, Hungary, Italy, India, China and Brazil that enrolled a total of 1638 eyes of 1245 adult participants. Overall, the studies were at unclear or high risk of bias. In 11 of the studies the authors reported financial links with the manufacturer of the laser platform evaluated in their studies. Five of the studies were within-person (paired-eye) studies with one eye allocated to one procedure and the other eye allocated to the other procedure. These studies were reported ignoring the paired nature of the data.The number of anterior capsule and posterior capsule tears reported in the included studies for both laser cataract surgery and manual phacoemulsification cataract surgery were low. There were four anterior capsule tears and one posterior capsule tear in 1076 eyes reported in 10 studies (2 anterior capsule tears in laser arms, 2 anterior capsule tears and 1 posterior capsule tear in standard phacoemulsification arms). We are very uncertain as to the effect of laser-assisted surgery compared to standard phacoemulsification surgery with respect to these two outcomes. For postoperative cystoid macular oedema and elevated postoperative intraocular pressures, again the evidence was inconclusive (odds ratio (OR) 0.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20 to 1.68; 957 eyes, 9 studies, low certainty evidence; and OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.11 to 2.86; 903 eyes, 8 studies, low certainty evidence).We found little evidence of any important difference in postoperative visual acuity between laser-assisted and standard phacoemulsification arms. There was a small advantage for laser-assisted cataract surgery at six months in CDVA. However, the mean difference (MD) was -0.03 logMAR (95% CI -0.05 to -0.00; 224 eyes, 3 studies, low certainty evidence) which is equivalent to 1.5 logMAR letters and is therefore, clinically insignificant. No studies reported patient-reported outcome measures such as visual function.There were no data reported on costs or resource use but three studies reported the time taken to do the surgery. There was little evidence of any major difference between the two procedures in this respect (MD 0.1 minutes, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.21; 274 eyes, low certainty evidence). The evidence from the 16 randomised controlled trials RCTs included in this review could not determine the equivalence or superiority of laser-assisted cataract surgery compared to standard manual phacoemulsification for our chosen outcomes due to the low to very low certainty of the evidence available from these studies. As complications occur rarely, large, adequately powered, well designed, independent RCTs comparing the safety and efficacy of laser-assisted cataract surgery with standard phacoemulsification cataract surgery are needed. Standardised reporting of complications and visual and refractive outcomes for cataract surgery would facilitate future synthesis. Data on patient-reported outcomes and cost-effectiveness are needed. Paired-eye studies should be analysed and reported appropriately.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 107 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 <1%
Unknown 106 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 20%
Unspecified 20 19%
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Postgraduate 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Other 26 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 49 46%
Unspecified 27 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 11 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 30. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2019.
All research outputs
#574,063
of 13,622,595 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#1,789
of 10,684 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,063
of 258,940 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#34
of 141 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,622,595 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,684 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,940 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 141 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.