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Cone monochromacy and visual pigment spectral tuning in wobbegong sharks

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, September 2012
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Title
Cone monochromacy and visual pigment spectral tuning in wobbegong sharks
Published in
Biology Letters, September 2012
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2012.0663
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. M. Theiss, W. I. L. Davies, S. P. Collin, D. M. Hunt, N. S. Hart

Abstract

Much is known regarding the evolution of colour vision in nearly every vertebrate class, with the notable exception of the elasmobranchs. While multiple spectrally distinct cone types are found in some rays, sharks appear to possess only a single class of cone and, therefore, may be colour blind. In this study, the visual opsin genes of two wobbegong species, Orectolobus maculatus and Orectolobus ornatus, were isolated to verify the molecular basis of their monochromacy. In both species, only two opsin genes are present, RH1 (rod) and LWS (cone), which provide further evidence to support the concept that sharks possess only a single cone type. Examination of the coding sequences revealed substitutions that account for interspecific variation in the photopigment absorbance spectra, which may reflect the difference in visual ecology between these species.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 2%
Switzerland 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Canada 1 2%
Unknown 41 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 19%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 17%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 8 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 38 81%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 6%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 1 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2012.
All research outputs
#11,104,538
of 12,487,163 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#2,283
of 2,340 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,942
of 126,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#89
of 92 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,487,163 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,340 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 126,828 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 92 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.