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Dietary sodium and iodine in remote Indigenous Australian communities: will salt-reduction strategies increase risk of iodine deficiency? A cross-sectional analysis and simulation study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Dietary sodium and iodine in remote Indigenous Australian communities: will salt-reduction strategies increase risk of iodine deficiency? A cross-sectional analysis and simulation study
Published in
BMC Public Health, December 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2686-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emma McMahon, Jacqui Webster, Kerin O’Dea, Julie Brimblecombe

Abstract

Excess salt intake is a global issue. Effective salt-reduction strategies are needed, however, as salt is a vehicle for iodine fortification, these strategies may also reduce iodine intake. This study examines the case of the remote Indigenous Australian population; we employed an innovative, objective method to assess sodium and iodine intakes against requirements and modelled the potential effects of salt-reduction strategies on estimated sodium and iodine intakes. Store-sales data were collected from 20 remote Indigenous community stores in 2012-14 representing the main source of food for 2 years for ~8300 individuals. Estimated average sodium and iodine intakes were compared against recommendations (nutrient reference values weighted to age and gender distribution). Linear programming was employed to simulate potential effects of salt-reduction strategies on estimated sodium and iodine intakes. Estimated average sodium intake was 2770 (range within communities 2410-3450) mg/day, far exceeding the population-weighted upper limit (2060 mg/day). Discretionary (added) salt, bread and processed meat were the biggest contributors providing 46 % of all sodium. Estimated average iodine intake was within recommendations at 206 (186-246) μg/day. The following scenarios enabled modelling of estimated average salt intake to within recommendations: 1) 67 % reduction in sodium content of bread and discretionary salt intake, 2) 38 % reduction in sodium content of all processed foods, 3) 30 % reduction in sodium content of all processed foods and discretionary salt intake. In all scenarios, simulated average iodine intakes remained within recommendations. Salt intakes of the remote Indigenous Australian population are far above recommendations, likely contributing to the high prevalence of hypertension and cardiovascular mortality experienced by this population. Salt-reduction strategies could considerably reduce salt intake in this population without increasing risk of iodine deficiency at the population-level. These data add to the global evidence informing salt-reduction strategies and the evidence that these strategies can be synergistically implemented with iodine deficiency elimination programmes. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613000694718 .

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 21%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 12%
Researcher 4 8%
Other 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 13 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Psychology 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 14 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2019.
All research outputs
#1,228,173
of 14,110,318 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#1,436
of 9,710 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#31,071
of 259,195 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,110,318 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,710 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,195 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them