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Pitch and Loudness from Tinnitus in Individuals with Noise-induced Hearing Loss

Overview of attention for article published in International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, August 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

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1 tweeter
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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17 Dimensions

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40 Mendeley
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Title
Pitch and Loudness from Tinnitus in Individuals with Noise-induced Hearing Loss
Published in
International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology, August 2015
DOI 10.1055/s-0035-1562935
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leticia Flores, Adriane Teixeira, Leticia Rosito, Bruna Seimetz, Celso Dall'Igna

Abstract

Tinnitus is one of the symptoms that affects individuals suffering from noise induced hearing loss. This condition can be disabling, leading the affected individual to turn away from work. This literature review aims to analyze the possible association between gender and tinnitus pitch and loudness, the degree of hearing loss and the frequencies affected in subjects with noise-induced hearing loss. This contemporary cohort study was conducted through a cross-sectional analysis. The study sample consisted of adults with unilateral or bilateral tinnitus, who had been diagnosed with noise-induced hearing loss. The patients under analysis underwent an otorhinolaryngological evaluation, pure tone audiometry, and acuphenometry. The study included 33 subjects with noise-induced hearing loss diagnoses, of which 22 (66.7%) were men. Authors observed no statistical difference between gender and loudness/pitch tinnitus and loudness/pitch in subjects with bilateral tinnitus. Authors found an inverse relation between tinnitus loudness with intensity greater hearing threshold and the average of the thresholds and the grade of hearing loss. The tinnitus pitch showed no association with higher frequency of hearing threshold. Data analysis shows that, among the individuals evaluated, the greater the hearing loss, the lower the loudness of tinnitus. We did not observe an association between hearing loss and tinnitus pitch.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 20%
Student > Master 6 15%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 9 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 10%
Engineering 3 8%
Psychology 2 5%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 5%
Unknown 14 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 August 2016.
All research outputs
#17,346,343
of 21,468,133 outputs
Outputs from International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
#184
of 254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#198,468
of 273,255 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
#3
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,468,133 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 254 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 0.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,255 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.