↓ Skip to main content

A framework to evaluate research capacity building in health care

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, October 2005
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
3 policy sources
twitter
7 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
185 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
240 Mendeley
citeulike
4 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A framework to evaluate research capacity building in health care
Published in
BMC Family Practice, October 2005
DOI 10.1186/1471-2296-6-44
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jo Cooke

Abstract

Building research capacity in health services has been recognised internationally as important in order to produce a sound evidence base for decision-making in policy and practice. Activities to increase research capacity for, within, and by practice include initiatives to support individuals and teams, organisations and networks. Little has been discussed or concluded about how to measure the effectiveness of research capacity building (RCB) DISCUSSION: This article attempts to develop the debate on measuring RCB. It highlights that traditional outcomes of publications in peer reviewed journals and successful grant applications may be important outcomes to measure, but they may not address all the relevant issues to highlight progress, especially amongst novice researchers. They do not capture factors that contribute to developing an environment to support capacity development, or on measuring the usefulness or the 'social impact' of research, or on professional outcomes. The paper suggests a framework for planning change and measuring progress, based on six principles of RCB, which have been generated through the analysis of the literature, policy documents, empirical studies, and the experience of one Research and Development Support Unit in the UK. These principles are that RCB should: develop skills and confidence, support linkages and partnerships, ensure the research is 'close to practice', develop appropriate dissemination, invest in infrastructure, and build elements of sustainability and continuity. It is suggested that each principle operates at individual, team, organisation and supra-organisational levels. Some criteria for measuring progress are also given.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 240 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 7 3%
Canada 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Sierra Leone 1 <1%
Zambia 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 222 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 57 24%
Student > Master 41 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 15%
Professor > Associate Professor 20 8%
Other 17 7%
Other 52 22%
Unknown 18 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 81 34%
Social Sciences 47 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 29 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 13 5%
Psychology 9 4%
Other 33 14%
Unknown 28 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,122,935
of 14,067,163 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#136
of 1,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,993
of 131,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,067,163 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 131,558 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them