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The relationship between peripheral blood mononuclear cells telomere length and diet - unexpected effect of red meat

Overview of attention for article published in Nutrition Journal, July 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#44 of 1,409)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
424 tweeters
facebook
15 Facebook pages
reddit
5 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
146 Mendeley
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Title
The relationship between peripheral blood mononuclear cells telomere length and diet - unexpected effect of red meat
Published in
Nutrition Journal, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12937-016-0189-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marek Kasielski, Makandjou-Ola Eusebio, Mirosława Pietruczuk, Dariusz Nowak

Abstract

Repeated nucleotide sequences combined with proteins called telomeres cover chromosome ends and dictate cells lifespan. Many factors can modify telomere length, among them are: nutrition and smoking habits, physical activities and socioeconomic status measured by education level. The aim of the study was to determine the influence of above mentioned factors on peripheral blood mononuclear cells telomere length. Study included 28 subjects (seven male and 21 female, age 18-65 years.), smokers and non-smokers without any serious health problems in past and present. Following a basic medical examination, patients completed the food frequency questionnaire with 17 foods and beverages most common groups and gave blood for testing. PBMC telomere length were measured with qualitative real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (rtPCR) method and expressed as a T/S ratio. Among nine food types (cereal, fruits, vegetables, diary, red meat, poultry, fish, sweets and salty snacks) and eight beverages (juices, coffee, tea, mineral water, alcoholic- and sweetened carbonated beverages) only intake of red meat was related to T/S ratio. Individuals with increased consumption of red meat have had higher T/S ratio and the strongest significant differences were observed between consumer groups: "never" and "1-2 daily" (p = 0.02). Smoking habits, physical activity, LDL and HDL concentrations, and education level were not related to telomere length, directly or as a covariates. Unexpected correlation of telomere length with the frequency of consumption of red meat indicates the need for further in-depth research and may undermine some accepted concepts of adverse effects of this diet on the health status and life longevity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 424 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Unknown 144 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 30 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 10%
Student > Master 14 10%
Other 9 6%
Other 24 16%
Unknown 37 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 31 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 8%
Sports and Recreations 4 3%
Other 15 10%
Unknown 47 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 296. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2022.
All research outputs
#91,389
of 22,177,467 outputs
Outputs from Nutrition Journal
#44
of 1,409 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,960
of 274,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nutrition Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,177,467 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,409 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 274,338 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them