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“That never happened”: Adults' discernment of children's true and false memory reports.

Overview of attention for article published in Law and Human Behavior, January 2012
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Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
56 Mendeley
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Title
“That never happened”: Adults' discernment of children's true and false memory reports.
Published in
Law and Human Behavior, January 2012
DOI 10.1037/h0093920
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephanie D. Block, Donna Shestowsky, Daisy A. Segovia, Gail S. Goodman, Jennifer M. Schaaf, Kristen Weede Alexander

Abstract

Adults' evaluations of children's reports can determine whether legal proceedings are undertaken and whether they ultimately lead to justice. The current study involved 92 undergraduates and 35 laypersons who viewed and evaluated videotaped interviews of 3- and 5-year-olds providing true or false memory reports. The children's reports fell into the following categories based on a 2 (event type: true vs. false) × 2 (child report: assent vs. denial) factorial design: accurate reports, false reports, accurate denials, and false denials. Results revealed that adults were generally better able to correctly judge accurate reports, accurate denials, and false reports compared with false denials: For false denials, adults were, on average, "confident" that the event had not occurred, even though the event had in fact been experienced. Participant age predicted performance. These findings underscore the greater difficulty adults have in evaluating young children's false denials compared with other types of reports. Implications for law-related situations in which adults are called upon to evaluate children's statements are discussed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
Unknown 54 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Bachelor 8 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 13%
Student > Master 4 7%
Other 15 27%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 37 66%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 5%
Social Sciences 3 5%
Computer Science 2 4%
Sports and Recreations 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 8 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2016.
All research outputs
#7,393,492
of 12,316,589 outputs
Outputs from Law and Human Behavior
#452
of 820 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,254
of 127,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Law and Human Behavior
#6
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,316,589 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 820 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 127,096 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.