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Handoffs, safety culture, and practices: evidence from the hospital survey on patient safety culture

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (75th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

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118 Mendeley
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Title
Handoffs, safety culture, and practices: evidence from the hospital survey on patient safety culture
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1502-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Soo-Hoon Lee, Phillip H. Phan, Todd Dorman, Sallie J. Weaver, Peter J. Pronovost

Abstract

The context of the study is the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC). The purpose of the study is to analyze how different elements of patient safety culture are associated with clinical handoffs and perceptions of patient safety. The study was performed with hierarchical multiple linear regression on data from the 2010 Survey. We examine the statistical relationships between perceptions of handoffs and transitions practices, patient safety culture, and patient safety. We statistically controlled for the systematic effects of hospital size, type, ownership, and staffing levels on perceptions of patient safety. The main findings were that the effective handoff of information, responsibility, and accountability were necessary to positive perceptions of patient safety. Feedback and communication about errors were positively related to the transfer of patient information; teamwork within units and the frequency of events reported were positively related to the transfer of personal responsibility during shift changes; and teamwork across units was positively related to the unit transfers of accountability for patients. In summary, staff views on the behavioral dimensions of handoffs influenced their perceptions of the hospital's level of patient safety. Given the known psychological links between perception, attitude, and behavior, a potential implication is that better patient safety can be achieved by a tight focus on improving handoffs through training and monitoring.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 116 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 26%
Unspecified 15 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 12%
Other 12 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 9%
Other 35 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 38 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 37 31%
Unspecified 18 15%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 5%
Social Sciences 5 4%
Other 14 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 December 2018.
All research outputs
#2,955,340
of 13,044,924 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#1,227
of 4,338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,767
of 212,238 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#4
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,044,924 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,338 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,238 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.