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Can reactivity to stress and family environment explain memory and executive function performance in early and middle childhood?

Overview of attention for article published in Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, June 2016
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Title
Can reactivity to stress and family environment explain memory and executive function performance in early and middle childhood?
Published in
Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, June 2016
DOI 10.1590/2237-6089-2015-0085
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luciane da Rosa Piccolo, Jerusa Fumagalli de Salles, Olga Garcia Falceto, Carmen Luiza Fernandes, Rodrigo Grassi-Oliveira

Abstract

According to the literature, children's overall reactivity to stress is associated with their socioeconomic status and family environment. In turn, it has been shown that reactivity to stress is associated with cognitive performance. However, few studies have systematically tested these three constructs together. To investigate the relationship between family environment, salivary cortisol measurements and children's memory and executive function performance. Salivary cortisol levels of 70 children aged 9 or 10 years were measured before and after performing tasks designed to assess memory and executive functions. Questionnaires on socioeconomic issues, family environment and maternal psychopathologies were administered to participants' families during the children's early childhood and again when they reached school age. Data were analyzed by calculating correlations between variables and conducting hierarchical regression. High cortisol levels were associated with poorer working memory and worse performance in tasks involving executive functions, and were also associated with high scores for maternal psychopathology (during early childhood and school age) and family dysfunction. Family environment variables and changes in cortisol levels explain around 20% of the variance in performance of cognitive tasks. Family functioning and maternal psychopathology in early and middle childhood and children's stress levels were associated with children's working memory and executive functioning.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 4%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 4%
Researcher 2 4%
Student > Postgraduate 2 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 40 78%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 8 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Unknown 41 80%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2016.
All research outputs
#10,032,419
of 12,538,502 outputs
Outputs from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#41
of 72 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#184,559
of 262,002 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trends in Psychiatry and Psychotherapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,538,502 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 72 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.8. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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