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Epigenetic inactivation of inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4) correlates with prostate cancer

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Medicine, August 2012
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Title
Epigenetic inactivation of inhibitor of differentiation 4 (Id4) correlates with prostate cancer
Published in
Cancer Medicine, August 2012
DOI 10.1002/cam4.16
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pankaj Sharma, Swathi Chinaranagari, Divya Patel, Jason Carey, Jaideep Chaudhary

Abstract

The inhibitor of DNA-binding (Id) proteins, Id1-4 are negative regulators of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors. As key regulators of cell cycle and differentiation, expression of Id proteins are increasingly observed in many cancers and associated with aggressiveness of the disease. Of all the four Id proteins, the expression of Id1, Id2, and to a lesser extent, Id3 in prostate cancer and the underlying molecular mechanism is relatively well known. On the contrary, our previous results demonstrated that Id4 acts as a potential tumor suppressor in prostate cancer. In the present study, we extend these observations and demonstrate that Id4 is down-regulated in prostate cancer due to promoter hypermethylation. We used prostate cancer tissue microarrays to investigate Id4 expression. Methylation specific PCR on bisulfite treated DNA was used to determine methylation status of Id4 promoter in laser capture micro-dissected normal, stroma and prostate cancer regions. High Id4 expression was observed in the normal prostate epithelial cells. In prostate cancer, a stage-dependent decrease in Id4 expression was observed with majority of high grade cancers showing no Id4 expression. Furthermore, Id4 expression progressively decreased in prostate cancer cell line LNCaP and with no expression in androgen-insensitive LNCaP-C81 cell line. Conversely, Id4 promoter hypermethylation increased in LNCaP-C81 cells suggesting epigenetic silencing. In prostate cancer samples, loss of Id4 expression was also associated with promoter hypermethylation. Our results demonstrate loss of Id4 expression in prostate cancer due to promoter hypermethylation. The data strongly support the role of Id4 as a tumor suppressor.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 19 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 5%
Switzerland 1 5%
United States 1 5%
Unknown 16 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 7 37%
Researcher 5 26%
Student > Master 1 5%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Student > Postgraduate 1 5%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 53%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 11%
Materials Science 1 5%
Design 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 2 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2012.
All research outputs
#11,102,587
of 12,485,238 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Medicine
#647
of 868 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,866
of 128,213 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Medicine
#4
of 5 outputs
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