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FGF-2 regulates neurogenesis and degeneration in the dentate gyrus after traumatic brain injury in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical Investigation, October 2003
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Title
FGF-2 regulates neurogenesis and degeneration in the dentate gyrus after traumatic brain injury in mice
Published in
Journal of Clinical Investigation, October 2003
DOI 10.1172/jci16618
Pubmed ID
Authors

Shinichi Yoshimura, Tetsuyuki Teramoto, Michael J. Whalen, Michael C. Irizarry, Yasushi Takagi, Jianhua Qiu, Jun Harada, Christian Waeber, Xandra O. Breakefield, Michael A. Moskowitz

Abstract

We studied the role of FGF-2 on regulation of neurogenesis and cell loss in the granule cell layer (GCL) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). In both FGF-2(-/-) and FGF-2(+/+) mice subjected to controlled cortical impact, the number of dividing cells labeled with BrdU, injected on posttrauma days 6 through 8, increased at 9 days after TBI, and the number of BrdU-positive cells colabeled with neuron-specific nuclear antigen significantly increased at 35 days. However, in injured FGF-2-/- mice, BrdU-positive cells and BrdU-positive neurons (days 9, 35) were fewer compared with FGF-2(+/+) mice. There was also a decrease in the volume of the GCL and the number of GCL neurons after TBI in both FGF-2(-/-) and FGF-2(+/+) mice, but the decrease in both was greater in FGF-2-/- mice at 35 days. Overexpression of FGF-2 by intracerebral injection of herpes simplex virus-1 amplicon vectors encoding this factor increased numbers of dividing cells (day 9) and BrdU-positive neurons (day 35) significantly in C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, the decrease in GCL volume was also attenuated. These results suggest that FGF-2 upregulates neurogenesis and protects neurons against degeneration in the adult hippocampus after TBI, and that FGF-2 supplementation via gene transfer can reduce GCL degeneration after TBI.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Brazil 2 3%
Indonesia 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
Unknown 63 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 24%
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Researcher 11 16%
Professor > Associate Professor 9 13%
Student > Master 3 4%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 31%
Neuroscience 15 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Engineering 3 4%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2003.
All research outputs
#2,860,400
of 5,387,375 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical Investigation
#3,541
of 4,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,141
of 90,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical Investigation
#52
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,387,375 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,928 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.5. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 90,899 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.