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HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 in Celiac disease predisposition: practical implications of the HLA molecular typing

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2012
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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143 Dimensions

Readers on

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300 Mendeley
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Title
HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 in Celiac disease predisposition: practical implications of the HLA molecular typing
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1423-0127-19-88
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesca Megiorni, Antonio Pizzuti

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is a multifactorial disorder with an estimated prevalence in Europe and USA of 1:100 and a female:male ratio of approximately 2:1. The disorder has a multifactorial etiology in which the triggering environmental factor, the gluten, and the main genetic factors, Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 loci, are well known. About 90-95% of CD patients carry DQ2.5 heterodimers, encoded by DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 alleles both in cis or in trans configuration, and DQ8 molecules, encoded by DQB1*03:02 generally in combination with DQA1*03 variant. Less frequently, CD occurs in individuals positive for the DQ2.x heterodimers (DQA1≠*05 and DQB1*02) and very rarely in patients negative for these DQ predisposing markers. HLA molecular typing for Celiac disease is, therefore, a genetic test with a negative predictive value. Nevertheless, it is an important tool able to discriminate individuals genetically susceptible to CD, especially in at-risk groups such as first-degree relatives (parents, siblings and offspring) of patients and in presence of autoimmune conditions (type 1 diabetes, thyroiditis, multiple sclerosis) or specific genetic disorders (Down, Turner or Williams syndromes).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 300 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 291 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 63 21%
Student > Master 46 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 12%
Researcher 31 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 8%
Other 59 20%
Unknown 41 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 84 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 65 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 41 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 19 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 4%
Other 30 10%
Unknown 49 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 October 2021.
All research outputs
#6,542,620
of 20,830,231 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#247
of 913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#47,350
of 151,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,830,231 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 67th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 151,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them