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The origin of incipient ferroelectricity in lead telluride

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, July 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

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5 news outlets
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2 X users

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62 Dimensions

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122 Mendeley
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Title
The origin of incipient ferroelectricity in lead telluride
Published in
Nature Communications, July 2016
DOI 10.1038/ncomms12291
Pubmed ID
Authors

M. P. Jiang, M. Trigo, I. Savić, S. Fahy, É. D. Murray, C. Bray, J. Clark, T. Henighan, M. Kozina, M. Chollet, J. M. Glownia, M. C. Hoffmann, D. Zhu, O. Delaire, A. F. May, B. C. Sales, A. M. Lindenberg, P. Zalden, T. Sato, R. Merlin, D. A. Reis

Abstract

The interactions between electrons and lattice vibrations are fundamental to materials behaviour. In the case of group IV-VI, V and related materials, these interactions are strong, and the materials exist near electronic and structural phase transitions. The prototypical example is PbTe whose incipient ferroelectric behaviour has been recently associated with large phonon anharmonicity and thermoelectricity. Here we show that it is primarily electron-phonon coupling involving electron states near the band edges that leads to the ferroelectric instability in PbTe. Using a combination of nonequilibrium lattice dynamics measurements and first principles calculations, we find that photoexcitation reduces the Peierls-like electronic instability and reinforces the paraelectric state. This weakens the long-range forces along the cubic direction tied to resonant bonding and low lattice thermal conductivity. Our results demonstrate how free-electron-laser-based ultrafast X-ray scattering can be utilized to shed light on the microscopic mechanisms that determine materials properties.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 119 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 34%
Researcher 26 21%
Professor 9 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 4 3%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 19 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Physics and Astronomy 41 34%
Materials Science 33 27%
Engineering 10 8%
Chemistry 10 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 3 2%
Unknown 23 19%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2016.
All research outputs
#976,504
of 22,881,154 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#15,444
of 47,132 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,528
of 364,027 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#298
of 849 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,881,154 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 47,132 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 55.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 364,027 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 849 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.