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Parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding fever in children: an interview study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2016
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Title
Parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding fever in children: an interview study
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3224-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Kelly, Laura J. Sahm, Frances Shiely, Ronan O’Sullivan, Aoife McGillicuddy, Suzanne McCarthy

Abstract

Fever is one of the most common childhood symptoms. It causes significant worry and concern for parents. Every year there are numerous cases of over- and under-dosing with antipyretics. Caregivers seek reassurance from a variety of sources including healthcare practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe parental knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding management of childhood fever in children aged 5 years and under. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 23 parents at six ante-natal clinics in the south west of Ireland during March and April 2015. The Francis method was used to detect data saturation and thereby identify sample size. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Twenty-three parents participated in the study. Five themes emerged from the data: assessing and managing the fever; parental knowledge and beliefs regarding fever; knowledge source; pharmaceutical products; initiatives. Parents illustrated a good knowledge of fever as a symptom. However, management practices varied between participants. Parents revealed a reluctance to use medication in the form of suppositories. There was a desire for more accessible, consistent information to be made available for use by parents when their child had a fever or febrile illness. Parents indicated that further initiatives are required to provide trustworthy information on the management of fever and febrile illness in children. Healthcare professionals should play a significant role in educating parents in how to manage fever and febrile illnesses in their children. The accessible nature and location of pharmacies could provide useful support for both parents and General Practitioners.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 149 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 149 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 28 19%
Student > Master 20 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 4%
Other 22 15%
Unknown 55 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 44 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 22%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 3%
Computer Science 3 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 1%
Other 7 5%
Unknown 56 38%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 January 2020.
All research outputs
#13,652,521
of 23,878,777 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#9,465
of 15,680 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#186,275
of 359,437 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#222
of 345 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 23,878,777 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,680 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.3. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 359,437 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 345 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.