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Coordinative variability and overuse injury

Overview of attention for article published in Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology, November 2012
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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129 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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105 Dimensions

Readers on

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284 Mendeley
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Title
Coordinative variability and overuse injury
Published in
Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology, November 2012
DOI 10.1186/1758-2555-4-45
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph Hamill, Christopher Palmer, Richard E A Van Emmerik

Abstract

Overuse injuries are generally defined as a repetitive micro-trauma to tissue. Many researchers have associated particular biomechanical parameters as an indicator of such injuries. However, while these parameters have been reported in single studies, in many instances, it has been difficult to verify these parameters as causative to the injury. We have investigated overuse injuries, such as patella-femoral pain syndrome, using a dynamical systems approach. Using such methods, the importance of the structure of coordinative variability (i.e. the variability of the interaction between segments or joints) becomes apparent. We view coordinative variability as functionally important to the movement and different from end-point or goal variability. Using concepts derived from the work of Bernstein, we conducted studies using a continuous relative phase and/or modified vector coding approaches to investigate the coordinative variability of overuse injuries. Consistently, we have found that the higher variability state of a coordinative structure is the healthy state while the lower variability state is the unhealthy or pathological state. It is clear that very high coordinative variability could also result in injury and that there must be a window of 'higher variability' in which non-injured athletes function. While this finding that coordinative variability is functional has been shown in several studies, it is still not clear if reduced variability contributes to or results from the injury. Studies are currently underway to determine the potential reasons for the reduced variability in injured athletes. Nevertheless, our laboratory believes that this understanding of how joints interact can be important in understanding overuse injuries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 129 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 284 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 <1%
United States 2 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 279 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 76 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 44 15%
Student > Bachelor 33 12%
Researcher 24 8%
Student > Postgraduate 19 7%
Other 67 24%
Unknown 21 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 104 37%
Medicine and Dentistry 48 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 31 11%
Engineering 27 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 5%
Other 24 8%
Unknown 37 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 83. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 August 2019.
All research outputs
#213,282
of 14,024,149 outputs
Outputs from Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology
#1
of 62 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,556
of 249,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy, Rehabilitation, Therapy & Technology
#1
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,024,149 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 62 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,168 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.