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Dogs steal in the dark

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Cognition, November 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 985)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
17 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
157 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Dogs steal in the dark
Published in
Animal Cognition, November 2012
DOI 10.1007/s10071-012-0579-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Juliane Kaminski, Andrea Pitsch, Michael Tomasello

Abstract

All current evidence of visual perspective taking in dogs can possibly be explained by dogs reacting to certain stimuli rather than understanding what others see. In the current study, we set up a situation in which contextual information and social cues are in conflict. A human always forbade the dog from taking a piece of food. The part of the room being illuminated was then varied, for example, either the area where the human was seated or the area where the food was located was lit. Results show that dogs steal significantly more food when it is dark compared to when it is light. While stealing forbidden food the dog's behaviour also depends on the type of illumination in the room. Illumination around the food, but not the human, affected the dogs' behaviour. This indicates that dogs do not take the sight of the human as a signal to avoid the food. It also cannot be explained by a low-level associative rule of avoiding illuminated food which dogs actually approach faster when they are in private. The current finding therefore raises the possibility that dogs take into account the human's visual access to the food while making their decision to steal it.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 157 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
United Kingdom 3 2%
Germany 2 1%
Austria 2 1%
Hungary 2 1%
Turkey 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 140 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 24%
Student > Bachelor 21 13%
Researcher 20 13%
Student > Master 14 9%
Student > Postgraduate 13 8%
Other 52 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 54 34%
Psychology 46 29%
Unspecified 18 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 4%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Other 26 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 189. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2019.
All research outputs
#70,227
of 13,385,861 outputs
Outputs from Animal Cognition
#28
of 985 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#810
of 247,751 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Cognition
#1
of 15 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,385,861 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 985 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,751 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 15 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.